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I want to use Dependency Injection in my Test Project. I am using Unity Container version 3.0 to achieve this. The problem I am facing is the object is not getting created. Below is the sample code (dummy code) -

Registration Code -

var container = new UnityContainer();

container.RegisterType<IShape, Circle>();
container.Resolve<Circle>();

Test Class code -

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest
{
   private Drawing drawing = new Drawing();

   [TestMethod]
   public void Test1()
   {
       this.drawing.Draw();
   }
}

Class Drawing Code -

public class Drawing
{
  private IShape shape;

  [Dependency]
  public IShape Shape
  {
      get { return this.shape; }
      set { this.shape = value; }
  }

  public void Draw()
  {
    this.shape.Draw(); // Error - object reference not set to instance of any object.
  }
}

It looks like the Drawing object does not have the reference of the Shape object created by Unity. Is there any way I can achieve this?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you running this as a unit test? The UnitTest isn't using the container; it's just newing up a Drawing object so no injection will occur. –  Randy Levy Jul 17 '13 at 17:18
    
Yep, I agree with you. Is there other way i can achieve this. Injecting the Drawing class as dependency is not of use, because Drawing class will remain the same always. –  Jash Jul 17 '13 at 21:29
    
Not sure I follow you but yes, you can perform injection on an existing instance using the BuildUp method: container.BuildUp(drawing);. –  Randy Levy Jul 18 '13 at 5:25
    
@Tuzo: i think BuildUp will resolve dependency for existing objects. But in my application, Drawing object needs to be created after the Unity registration code. Also calling the Unity again to resolve the dependency will not be correct. What i want is - a way to resolve dependency of a type, without building the type where it is used. I can do this without Unity, but then i need to pass the concrete instances all the time and my code needs to be updated at more place s, when there is a change. –  Jash Jul 18 '13 at 13:06
    
Maybe reading about Composition Root will help? –  Randy Levy Jul 18 '13 at 13:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use the TestInitialize attribute to create and configure a container to be used for the specific test:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest
{
    private IUnityContainer container;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void TestInitialize()
    {
        container = new UnityContainer();

        container.RegisterType<IShape, Circle>();
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Test1()
    {
       var drawing = container.Resolve<Drawing>();

       // Or Buildup works too:
       //
       // var drawing = new Drawing();
       // container.BuildUp(drawing)

       this.drawing.Draw();
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. But by this we will have the DI container floating all over are code. In my test project i have more than 20 test Class and still counting. As per the guidelines, we should only have the container at one place. –  Jash Jul 18 '13 at 17:03
    
These are unit tests and the container only exists for duration of the test. If you want you can definitely centralize container creation and extend the lifetime (e.g. singleton accessed by all test cases). However, frequently each set of tests needs to have the container configured in a certain way in order to facilitate the test so you probably wouldn't have only one container setup. –  Randy Levy Jul 18 '13 at 17:32
    
Yep i think that cannot be done. I will take this approach and implement. Thanks Tuzo.. :) –  Jash Jul 19 '13 at 9:05

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