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This is a little bit of fun. Can you devise the shortest program which compiles but does nothing but immediately crash when executed? Wherefore by "crash" we mean that the program stops with an error condition (a core dump for example).

Is there a language that crashes faster (7 chars) than C using a gcc compiler? [I leave this answer for somebody to find.]

(It should be allowable to use compiler flags. Otherwise 7 wouldn't work nowadays, compiler checks became much better.)

[evaluation of results] I am unable to mark a single answer because there are multiple correct ones for multiple languages. It would not be fair to disqualify one answer for another. Please use votes for choosing best answers.

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6  
What do you mean by "crashes"? Does it have to cause an error, can it get stuct in an infinite loop? Or does it have to take the whole machine down? –  rjmunro Nov 20 '09 at 13:33
8  
You can't write a valid C program in 7 characters at all. –  paxdiablo Nov 20 '09 at 13:36
4  
This is a real question - it's a code-golf –  thecoop Nov 20 '09 at 13:57
2  
Doesn't follow Code-Golf rules... –  ajdams Nov 20 '09 at 19:18
3  
Bonus points for taking down the entire network. –  Michael Myers Nov 25 '09 at 18:45
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35 Answers 35

Bah - I can crash C in 5 characters:

main;

This declares an implicit int variable called 'main'. It's global so the variable has an initial value of 0. It's C the names aren't decorated - so the linker doesn't realize that it's a var and not a function.

GCC gave me a warning - but that's all.

$ gcc crash.c 
crash.c:1: warning: data definition has no type or storage class
$ ./a.exe
Segmentation fault (core dumped)
$
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1  
Thank's, that's at least shorter than the answer I mentioned in the question (apply a "=0" where appropriate). Explanation covers it. –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 15:02
6  
This is even funnier if you run it under valgrind: valgrind: the 'impossible' happened: ... –  Tim Post Apr 24 '10 at 5:58
1  
Undefined behavior :) –  Demetri Mar 25 at 0:25
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Crash with 0 characters:

$ > golf.c
$ gcc -Wl,--defsym=main=0 golf.c
$ ./a.out
Segmentation fault
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19  
Pssh, using special compiler flags should be included in the character count. =] –  strager Nov 20 '09 at 23:06
2  
and sadly, you still haven't: command line switches count against your strokes. :) –  Robert P Nov 21 '09 at 0:59
4  
I did the post as an example that command line can do everything one wants (including making a shell command that appends the code into an empty file, and declaring that shell command as the compiler). There should be a more precise rule set for this question, i think. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 21 '09 at 1:57
1  
@paxdiablo: I think an empty program was submitted to the obfuscated C contest as the shortest self-outputting program in some language. Hilarity ensued. But I may be conflated separate incidents. –  Jack V. Nov 23 '09 at 17:17
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I wonder if this counts...

a

This is in JavaScript. This gives the runtime error of "object not found". Since JavaScript is a dynamic language, syntactically this is actually correct. Still feels like twisting the rules. :P

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4  
@roe: IIRC, semicolons are used as separators between statements in Javascript, so you don't need one after the last statement. –  Guffa Nov 20 '09 at 14:07
1  
I should have distinguished between compiler languages and script languages, but then we'd argued about what is to be considered a script language. (This works in python as well.) –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 14:19
1  
@roe yes this is a valid statement because javascript will perform semicolon insertion. Also, just like C, a pointless evaluation statement is allowed in javascript, someVar; doesn't really do anything useful, but the variable gets evaluated and it is part of the spec. –  TM. Nov 20 '09 at 14:34
3  
Actually, semicolons are completely optional in JavaScript. Try it yourself! And yes - I suppose this might work in a whole range of dynamic scripting languages. I'm just not familiar with any others. –  Vilx- Nov 20 '09 at 20:45
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using python:

1/0
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1  
3 Chars, that's indeed short. –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 13:57
2  
reading Vilx answer, i thought of something better: a will crash with a NameError. –  Adrien Plisson Nov 20 '09 at 14:18
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X86 machine code: 1 byte

From cmd prompt in windows create file a.com containing byte F4, x86 halt instruction:

F:\>debug
-a 100
0BFD:0100 hlt
0BFD:0101
-r cx
CX 0000
:1
-n a.com
-w
Writing 00001 bytes
-q

F:\>a.com

The NTVDM CPU has encountered illegal instruction

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$ cat > crash.S
hlt
$ as -o crash.o crash.S
$ ld crash.o
ld: warning: cannot find entry symbol _start; defaulting to 0000000008048054
$ ./a.out
Segmentation fault
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1  
Shortest assembler program so far. –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 15:45
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Perl

die
Died at test line 1.


die

prints the value of LIST to STDERR and exits with the current value of $! (errno).

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10  
As are all programs when they crash.... This is just being a little more straightforward. –  RCIX Nov 21 '09 at 6:11
4  
This not only crashes as asked, it is also the most readable of all. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 22 '09 at 0:40
67  
The first question I've seen where Perl had the most readable solution. –  ShreevatsaR Nov 22 '09 at 5:34
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Commodore 64 BASIC:

poke 2,2:sys2

or shorter (using PETSCII graphic-char shortcuts):

pO2,2:sY2

(crash: $02 invalid opcode on MOS/CSG6510). Actually it can be done in 7 bytes (3-instructions):

lda #$02
sta $02
jmp $0002
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2  
+1 for Commodore 64 basic. I would give you more be alas stack overflow does not let me. –  mlk Nov 23 '09 at 11:54
1  
Suggested improvement: poke 1,0 (or pO1,0, 5 characters) to do bank switching. Now the CPU will run random garbage from memory instead of the BASIC interpreting code, leading to a freeze. –  stubbscroll May 24 '13 at 19:27
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If you're at a computer store that has TI-89s, you can crash one by typing this in:

Exec "00000000"

(that's 8 zeros)

It will yield "Illegal Instruction". Press 2nd+Left+Right+ON to reset the calc.

If you want to have more fun, do this:

Exec "4E4A4E750000"

That launches the hidden hardware test menu, including memory tests, LCD tests (draws checkerboards et al.) and more. Unfortunately, the status bar gets erased, and nothing in the calc's OS draws it back, so to clean up after yourself, reset per the instructions above, or do this:

Exec "307C56E670FF20C020C020C020C020C04E750000"
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2  
You can crash it by Execing pretty much anything that isn't valid. –  Josh Lee Nov 23 '09 at 6:07
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Brainf*ck

5 characters

+[>+]

It will take it a while, but eventually the program will run out of memory and inevitably crash.

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1  
Not for compilers which use wrapping for memory. –  strager Nov 20 '09 at 23:07
3  
Those aren't Turing complete. Where's the fun in that? –  Josh Lee Nov 23 '09 at 5:59
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Factor (or Forth)

.

"Data stack underflow"

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How about java Z? If no file exists it will "crash" with a java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError. So my answer is zero letters. If that is not valid then...

class T{}

Would "crash" with $ java T Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: main

If you want something that actually runs, then if you are willing to abuse things a little

class T{static {int i =1/0;}}

Else

class T{public static void main(String[]a){main(a);}}
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1  
What's that space doing between T and {}? :-) –  paxdiablo Nov 20 '09 at 13:42
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to quote this answer:

All these answers and no Befunge? I'd wager a fair amount it's shortest solution of them all:

1

Not kidding. Try it yourself: http://www.quirkster.com/js/befunge.html

EDIT: I guess I need to explain this one. The 1 operand pushes a 1 onto Befunge's internal stack and the lack of anything else puts it in a loop under the rules of the language.

Using the interpreter provided, you will eventually--and I mean eventually--hit a point where the Javascript array that represents the Befunge stack becomes too large for the browser to reallocate. If you had a simple Befunge interpreter with a smaller and bounded stack--as is the case with most of the languages below--this program would cause a more noticeable overflow faster.

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In C, 20 characters:

void main(){main();}

Update: Suggested by roe, 15 characters:

main(){main();}

Note: Tested with VC++ 2008.

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2  
Not valid according to the standard :-) –  paxdiablo Nov 20 '09 at 13:38
4  
"main(){return main();}" is though. –  falstro Nov 20 '09 at 13:42
1  
Actually it should crash after a lot of recursions. And thus "work" according to the question. –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 13:44
2  
@paxdiablo: there isn't a 'the standard' there's a C99 standard and a C89 standard (and a bunch of others as well). x(){...} is perfectly valid for int x(void) {...} in earlier C standards. So it's valid C under that standard. –  falstro Nov 20 '09 at 13:56
6  
So, even if it isn't valid according to the standard, what's the problem? It compiles and crashes. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 22 '09 at 0:37
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Late, but whatever. PHP, 32 characters.

$r=function($z){$z($z);};$r($r);

gives Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 261900 bytes) in ...

Technically, I could also do it in 29 with

$r=function($z){$z();};$r(0);

But that isn't as much fun as infinite recursion. That, and I don't think "undefined function" errors should count as "compiling" in a scripting language, otherwise:

Z();

would be the smallest solution.

Also, instead of crashing, how about (as a script) surpassing max execution time? 8 chars:

for(;;);

My original take on that had a $i++ in the third expression of the for loop, but because PHP treats all integers as signed, instead of overflowing, it just goes negative.

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Try this in assembly:

push 0
ret

of course add the all other garbage to compile into an application.

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in windows powershell:

throw
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6  
The 1/0 trick does it in powershell as well. No reason to waste two innocent characters ;-) –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 15:47
2  
:) (I just wanted to insert this smiley but SO requires comments to be at least 15 characters long, so that is 158 more innocent characters wasted. I am sorry.) –  Jan Willem B Nov 21 '09 at 22:57
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Perl in only 2 chars.

&a
Undefined subroutine &main::a called at test.pl line 1.
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In QBasic:

? 1/0

(At least I think it'll still compile and then crash with divide-by-zero; it's been quite some time...)

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1  
I don't believe the space is necessary. –  recursive Dec 27 '09 at 18:54
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In C, 33 characters:

int main(void){return*((int*)0);}
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1  
returning a dereferenced null pointer, even without the assignment, will do the trick. –  Mikeage Nov 20 '09 at 13:41
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Golfscript - 1 Char

Lots of operators can do it, eg

*
(eval):1:in `initialize': undefined method `class_id' for nil:NilClass (NoMethodError)
from ../golfscript.rb:285:in `call'
from ../golfscript.rb:285:in `go'
from (eval):1:in `initialize'
from ../golfscript.rb:285:in `call'
from ../golfscript.rb:285:in `go'
from ../golfscript.rb:477
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F# 3 characters

1/0

Does compile, though gives a warning.

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1  
We may call it the almost ultimate script-crasher. ;-) –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 15:53
1  
@unknown(yahoo): Haskell would be mathematically wrong. 1/0 is not infinity, it is undefined - rearranging the equation: infinity * 0 == 1? Unlikely. I vaguely remember a lecture in my engineering course where the lecturer constructed a system where a division by zero had a valid result. –  Skizz Dec 11 '09 at 13:53
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Lua, 3 characters

The divide by zero does not cause problems in Lua, but here something just as short:

a()

gives:

lua: isort.lua:1: attempt to call global 'a' (a nil value)
stack traceback:
    a.lua:1: in main chunk
    [C]: ?
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1  
Lua uses double-precision floating-point values for numbers, so print(1/0) --> 1.#INF on Windows and print(1/0) --> inf on Linux. –  gwell Nov 24 '09 at 16:35
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F#, 11 characters

box 0 :?> unit

Compiles without a warning. Crashes with: System.InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'System.Int32' to type 'Microsoft.FSharp.Core.Unit'.

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main = undefined

In Haskell.

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1  
Shorter: main=main (produces <<loop>> with GHC, at least) –  Joey Adams Jan 3 '13 at 21:54
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PostScript, 1 character

Like GolfScript:

*

Syntactically legal, but crashes during runtime because the token * is not defined (different reason than why GolfScript crashes).

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int main () { int n = 0; return 1 / n; }
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1  
couldn't you shorten this to int n = 1/0; ? –  GSto Nov 20 '09 at 13:34
6  
No, the compiler will notice it so we need to trick it. –  user151323 Nov 20 '09 at 13:35
1  
That's not a complete program :-) –  paxdiablo Nov 20 '09 at 13:36
1  
It is, if it compiles. –  Don Johe Nov 20 '09 at 14:05
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It depends upon the allowed max stack size for a thread. But it does crash when compiled using VC9:

int main()
{
    int a[10000000];
    return 0;
};
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Perl

3 characters

1/0

Produces:

Illegal division by zero at crash.pl line 1.

(still looking for something that will do it in two..)

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1  
Compilation errors? "Can you device the shortest program which compiles but does nothing but immediately crash when executed?" –  Mark Rushakoff Nov 20 '09 at 18:32
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