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Trying to get a 3d party jQuery library working with two pretty simple custom directives:

Can't get ng-click to work and not sure how to get the data from the repeated element in the link function.

When you click on a slide it's name and hidden data should append on the list below it.

jsfiddle

angular.module('sm', [])
.directive('selector', function () {
return {
    restrict: "E",
    template: '<div class="swiper-wrapper">' +
        '<div class="swiper-slide" ng-repeat="slide in slides">' +
        '<h1 ng-click="selected(slide)">{{ slide.name }}</h1>' +
        '</div></div>',
    replace: true,
    controller: ['$scope', '$timeout', function ($scope, $timeout) {

        $scope.slides = [{
            name: 'one',
            hidden: 'kittens'
        }, {
            name: 'two',
            hidden: 'puppies'
        }, {
            name: 'three',
            hidden: 'bacon'
        }];
        $timeout(function () { // important!
            $.swiper.init();
        });

        // ng-click never fired due to the jQuery slider plugin
        $scope.selected = function (data) {
            console.log('ng-click called $scope.selected');
            $scope.$broadcast('slideSelected', data);
        };
    }],
    link: function linkFn(scope, lElement, attrs) {

        lElement.on('click', function (el) {
            console.log('lElement on click called');
            // how do I get access to the clicked element's data?
            scope.$broadcast('slideSelected', el);
            $
        })
    }
}
})
      .directive('selected', function () {
        return {
            restrict: "E",
            template: '<ul>' +
                '<li ng-repeat="selection in selected">{{ selection }}</li>' +
                '</ul>',
            replace: true,
            controller: ['$scope', function ($scope) {
                var selected = ['Add to me', 'please'];
                $scope.selected = selected;
                $scope.$on('slideSelected', function (data) {
                    $scope.$apply(function () {
                        selected.push(selected);
                    })
                });
            }],
        }
    })
        .controller('MyCtrl', function ($scope) {});

    $.swiper = {
        init: function () {
            var mySwiper = $('.swiper-container').swiper({
                mode: 'horizontal',
                loop: true
            });
        }
    };
share|improve this question
    
What exactly should happen when you click where? – Nick Larsen Jul 17 '13 at 15:53
    
Updated the question for you – Rob B Jul 17 '13 at 16:26
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A few things of note here:

1. If you're not creating your directive in such a way that child directives should be able to require it and get access to its controller, you may consider just using a link function instead of a controller. The $timeout dependency can be moved to the directive factory function.

2. Your directives were sharing a scope; since the directives weren't told to create a new or isolate scope, their respective scope.selected properties (a function in one and a value in the other) were overwriting each other.

An isolate scope fixes this problem, but then you can't do the scope.$broadcast as the scopes are no longer connected. Your choices are

  1. Broadcast the event on the parent scope: scope.$parent.$broadcast
  2. Broadcast the event on the $rootScope (which is the ultimate parent of all scopes)
  3. Use a shared service instead of event broadcasts (this is probably what I would do)

3. If you look at the documentation for Scope#$on, you'll see that the first argument to the listener function is the event that was triggered; the second argument will be your custom data sent into the $broadcast function.

4. In 1.1.x versions of Angular, you can't have identical data in an ng-repeat attribute without adding a track by clause to tell Angular what data it should use to determine if the data is really a duplicate. Here we use $index:

<li ng-repeat="selection in selected track by $index">{{ selection }}</li>

Addressing these issues gets us to this code: http://jsfiddle.net/BinaryMuse/hCdJA/; the problem is that the ng-click is still being eaten by the jQuery plugin. This class of issue isn't uncommon when working with third-party jQuery plugins in Angular, and the answer is usually to write a directive to wrap the plugin's functionality.


After a bit of effort, I have a set of directives that wrap Swiper's functionality (at least the bit we care about; Swiper has a pretty wide surface area in terms of API, so I didn't cover it all) in a fairly reusable way. I had a very hard time getting setData and getData to work correctly (I suspect it's a bug in the plugin) so ended up hacking my way around the with regular data() calls and an external object to store the callbacks.

Before we get into the code, you can see a working demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/BinaryMuse/UruNG/

Here's the final HTML:

<div ng-app="sm">
  <div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
    <swiper>
      <slide ng-repeat="slide in slides" ng-click="select(slide)">
        <h1>{{slide.name}}</h1>
      </slide>
    </swiper>
    <ul>
      <li ng-repeat="item in items track by $index">{{item | json}}</li>
    </ul>
  </div>
</div>

I've split off the swiper and slide elements to make them reusable and composable; the slide directive uses the require attribute to get at the controller defined by the parent swiper directive to get access to a function that it exposes.

Here's the JavaScript to make it work:

angular.module('sm', [])
.directive('swiper', function($timeout) {
  return {
    restrict: 'EA',
    template: "<div class='swiper-container'>" +
      "<div class='swiper-wrapper'></div>" +
      "<div style='display: none' ng-transclude></div>" +
      "</div>",
    replace: true,
    transclude: true,
    // We use a controller here so the slide directive
    // can require it and call `addSlide`.
    controller: function($element) {
      var newSlides = [];
      var mySwiper = null;
      var slideCount = 0;
      var callbacks = {};

      // Attached directly to the controller so other directives
      // have access to it.
      this.addSlide = function(html, callback) {
        if (mySwiper) {
          var newSlide = mySwiper.createSlide(html.html());
          // Hackily save off the callback based on
          // a unique ID since getData() for
          // swiper.clickedSlide doesn't appear to work
          // when using setData() on newSlide.
          newSlide.data('slideNumber', ++slideCount);
          mySwiper.appendSlide(newSlide);
          callbacks[slideCount] = callback;
          mySwiper.swipeTo(0, 0, false);
        } else {
          // mySwiper hasn't been initialized yet; save
          // the slide off in an array so we can add it later.
          newSlides.push({html: html, callback: callback});
        }
      };

      $timeout(function() {
        mySwiper = $element.swiper({
          mode: 'horizontal',
          loop: true,
          onSlideClick: function(swiper) {
            // Look up the callback we saved off and call it.
            var clicked = swiper.clickedSlide;
            var slideNumber = clicked.data('slideNumber');
            var callback = callbacks[slideNumber];
            if (callback) callback();
          }
        });

        // Now that mySwiper has been initialized, iterate
        // over any calls to `addSlide` that happened
        // before we were ready and add them to the swiper.
        for (var i = 0; i < newSlides.length; i++) {
          var slide = newSlides[i];
          this.addSlide(slide.html, slide.callback);
        }
      }.bind(this));
    }
  }
})
.directive('slide', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'EA',
    // Look for a parent `swiper` element and get its controller 
    require: '^swiper',
    template: "<div class='swiper-slide' ng-transclude></div>",
    replace: true,
    transclude: true,
    link: function(scope, elem, attrs, swiper) {
      swiper.addSlide(elem, function() {
        scope.$apply(attrs.ngClick);
      });
    }
  }
})
.controller('MyCtrl', function ($scope) {
  $scope.slides = [{
    name: 'one',
    hidden: 'kittens'
  }, {
    name: 'two',
    hidden: 'puppies'
  }, {
    name: 'three',
    hidden: 'bacon'
  }];

  $scope.items = ["Add to me", "please"];

  $scope.select = function(slide) {
    $scope.items.push(slide);
  };
});

You can see that we've managed to keep all the Swiper-specific functionality to the directives, while the data we're looping over (slides) and the callback to fire (select) are attached to the controller scope, where they make more sense (as they are application-specific data).

Again, the working demonstration can be found here: http://jsfiddle.net/BinaryMuse/UruNG/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much, really appreciated. – Rob B Jul 17 '13 at 20:10
    
No problem; feel free to ping me if you have any more questions. – Michelle Tilley Jul 17 '13 at 20:20

I notice a couple of things:

1) you don't need the linking function at all. When you use a template, angular takes care of compiling the directives inside the template. Additionally, your linking function was binding to the selector element, not each li individually, hence why you couldn't determine the data object for which one was clicked.

2) Your directives are using the inherited scope, but both assigning different things to the same property name. In the selector directive, you are assigning $scope.selected to be a function. In the selected directive, you are assigning $scope.selected to be an array of values. These interfere because they are using the same scope. I was able to fix it by changing the first one to just $scope.select = function(data)....

3) Your wrote your event handler to look for the data as the first parameter. The event is the first parameter, any arguments after that bind to the arguments passed when broadcasting the event, so it would have been better like $scope.$on('slideSelected', function(event, data)....

4) You event handler does not need to apply the scope because that will happen automatically, instead just update the model.

The updated fiddle is here.

share|improve this answer

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