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I have a question regarding the scrolling of a background image that repeats it self endlessly. The problem i am having is that it is starts off fast but quickly become slower and slower (stuttering etc.). Here is the code:

var panoramaTimeOutId = null;
var panoramaPosition = null;
$('.panorama-left').mousedown(function() {
    panoramaTimeOutId = setInterval(function(){
        panoramaMove(8, 1)
    }, 50);
}).bind('mouseup mouseleave', function() {
       clearInterval(panoramaTimeOutId);
});
$('.panorama-right').mousedown(function() {
    panoramaTimeOutId = setInterval(function(){
        panoramaMove(8, 2)
    }, 50);
}).bind('mouseup mouseleave', function() {
        clearInterval(panoramaTimeOutId);
});
function panoramaMove(amount, direction)
{
    var panorama = document.getElementsByClassName('panorama_foto')[0];
    if(panoramaPosition == null)
    {
        panoramaPosition = panorama.style.backgroundPosition;
        panoramaPosition = parseInt(panoramaPosition[0].replace("px",""));
    }
    if(direction == 1)
    {
        panoramaPosition = panoramaPosition + amount;
        panorama.style.backgroundPosition = panoramaPosition+"px";
    }
    else
    {
        panoramaPosition = panoramaPosition - amount;
        panorama.style.backgroundPosition = panoramaPosition+"px";
    }
}

And i have already tried a few things for optimization.Like writing the function with standard javascript. Calculating the panoramaPosition only one time before just incrementing it through a variable that only contains a simple int. Yet it still stutters.

I also tried changing the interval timing and the amount of px but it still stutters on certain computers. For example the site is designed for tablets on tablets it stutters on the pc on which i program it does not. And it is mandatory that it works properly on the tablet.

Here is a JSbin example: http://jsbin.com/upociv/1/edit

Hopefully somebody can give tips on how to optimize this or general suggestions how i would improve it.

Quick note: must be supported by Ipad (1/2/3) all galaxy tablets and ie 8+ firefox chrome etc.

share|improve this question
    
Do this with CSS 3, not JavaScript. Relevant MDN page. –  Paul S. Jul 17 '13 at 17:00
    
ie8 and up have to be supported. So CSS3 animations are not an option. Well not for this specific aspect of the site. –  Schippie Jul 17 '13 at 17:03
    
Instead of moving the panoramaPosition by an ever-increasing number of pixels, move it by panoramaPosition % (image width) instead. That might help. –  Blazemonger Jul 17 '13 at 17:08
    
Can i ask what that exactly does in this context? I mean doesn't that simply move the image by the remaining px of a division? –  Schippie Jul 17 '13 at 17:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of moving the panoramaPosition by an ever-increasing number of pixels, try moving it by panoramaPosition % (image width) instead.

This way, you won't have the browser trying to invisibly tile the background image starting 10,000 pixels to the left -- instead, it will never have to tile it more than twice. (You'll also avoid the small, but nonzero, possibility of an integer overflow error.)

if(direction == 1)
{
    panoramaPosition = panoramaPosition + amount;
    panorama.style.backgroundPosition = (panoramaPosition%1277)+"px";
}
else
{
    panoramaPosition = panoramaPosition - amount;
    panorama.style.backgroundPosition = (panoramaPosition%1277)+"px";
}

http://jsbin.com/upociv/2/edit

However, if you can implement this in CSS3, you should -- Modernizr lets you detect in JavaScript whether a browser supports CSS3 transitions and transformations or not.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just tried it out on the two tablets here both worked without a hitch :) thank you very much. And i know i should probably do this purely as a fallback option. Might look into it though it is all based on time short duration to finish the project so if there is time i will make this a fallback option for older browsers that do not support animations. (wish i could upvote you :< need more points for that hopefully somebody else can give you an upvote) –  Schippie Jul 17 '13 at 17:21
    
Great solution. I think the Modulus operator is far underused by many programmers. –  dev_row Jul 17 '13 at 17:40

jQuery has large overheads so I've been playing with re-writing it to not use jQuery since my comment. Also, to cache as much as possible. Calling Panorama returns an Object which has everything neatly in properties. First two params are required.

I did a compatibility thing for addEventListener I called listen, you might need one for getElementsByClassName, too.

Demo and Code

function Panorama(fullheight, fullwidth, foto, left, right) {
    var panorama = {};
    // crossbrowser listener
    function listen(node, ev, fn) {
        var a = ev.split(' '), i;
        if (node.addEventListener)
            for (i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
                node.addEventListener(a[i], fn);
        else
            for (i = 0; i < a.length; ++i)
                node.attachEvent('on' + a[i], fn);
    }
    // short convert (px?) string to number, might be useful
    function Xpx(s) {
        return parseFloat(s.replace(/[^\d.]/, ''));
    }
    // movement
    function move(amount, direction) {
        if(direction) {
            panorama.position += amount;
            if (panorama.position > panorama.width)
                panorama.position %= panorama.width;
            foto.style.backgroundPosition = panorama.position + 'px';
        }
        else {
            panorama.position -= amount;
            if (panorama.position < 0)
                panorama.position = panorama.width - ((-panorama.position) % panorama.width);
            foto.style.backgroundPosition = panorama.position + 'px';
        }
    }
    function zoom(scale) {
        panorama.scale = scale;
        panorama.height = scale * fullheight;
        panorama.width = scale * fullwidth;
        foto.style.zoom = scale;
    }
    panorama.move = move;
    panorama.zoom = zoom;
    // cache nodes
    if (!foto) foto = document.getElementsByClassName('panorama_foto')[0];
    if (!left) left = document.getElementsByClassName('panorama-left')[0];
    if (!right) right = document.getElementsByClassName('panorama-right')[0];
    panorama.node = {
        foto: foto,
        left: left,
        right: right
    };
    // panorama scaled size info
    panorama.height = fullheight;
    panorama.width = fullwidth;
    panorama.scale = 1;
    // values
    panorama.timeout = null;
    panorama.position = 0;
    // left
    listen(left, 'mousedown', function() {
        panorama.timeout = setInterval(
            function(){ move(8, 1); },
            50
        );
    });
    listen(left, 'mouseup mouseout', function() { clearInterval(panorama.timeout); });
    // right
    listen(right, 'mousedown', function() {
        panorama.timeout = setInterval(
            function(){ move(8, 0); },
            50
        );
    });
    listen(right, 'mouseup mouseout', function() { clearInterval(panorama.timeout); });
    return panorama;
}

var pan = Panorama(414, 1277);
share|improve this answer
    
I am no longer at work (also the reason it took so long for me to reply) so cant test this solution. But i would guess if this is combined with the above answer the result would be even better due to the fact its pure javascript. I will try it out tomorrow might merge the two answers. Also that position part is a smart change. Since it is always 0 at page load. Thank you :) –  Schippie Jul 17 '13 at 18:54
    
Using pure JS instead of jQuery is really only practically advantageous if you're performing large loops -- like, thousands of repetitions. Even then, the convenience usually outweighs the milliseconds of additional processing. –  Blazemonger Jul 17 '13 at 20:05
    
@Blazemonger The biggest optimisation in this answer is most likely to be the caching rather than removing jQuery, true. I just did anything I thought might be an optimisation, even if it was a micro optimisation, since the main idea was to reduce stutter after all. –  Paul S. Jul 17 '13 at 21:09

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