Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm having trouble creating a table in MySQL. Essentially, I need a composite key using "client_id" and "problem_id". In the table "clients", "client_id" is the primary key so I want to keep this relationship, and "problem_id" needs to be auto incrementing.

CREATE TABLE problems (
client_id BIGINT(10) NOT NULL REFERENCES clients(client_id),
problem_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
status CHAR(1) NOT NULL,
description VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
start_date VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL,
end_date VARCHAR(10),
PRIMARY KEY (client_id, problem_id)
);

MySQL won't accept this, but it seems logical to me. How can I achieve such a table?

share|improve this question
    
Are you obliged to use InnoDB? – Strawberry Jul 17 '13 at 19:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two problems:

  • InnoDB requires that the auto_increment column be the first column in your primary key.

  • InnoDB does not support column-level REFERENCES syntax, it only supports table-level FOREIGN KEY constraint syntax.

This should work:

CREATE TABLE problems (
 client_id BIGINT(10) NOT NULL,
 problem_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 status CHAR(1) NOT NULL,
 description VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
 start_date VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL,
 end_date VARCHAR(10),
 PRIMARY KEY (problem_id, client_id),
 FOREIGN KEY (client_id) REFERENCES clients(client_id)
);

However, this means that your clustered index (the primary key) is going to benefit lookups by problem_id, but not lookups by client_id.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes - the error message seems somewhat misleading in this respect ! "ERROR 1075 (42000): Incorrect table definition; there can be only one auto column and it must be defined as a key" – Strawberry Jul 17 '13 at 19:06

According to the AUTO INCREMENT docs, you can only use an auto-increment column in a composite key if you're using the MyISAM or BDB engines:

For MyISAM and BDB tables you can specify AUTO_INCREMENT on a secondary column in a multiple-column index.

If you're using InnoDB, this presumably isn't allowed. I'd suggest using only the problem_id as the primary key - it's unique on its own and I don't see any benefit in combining it with the client_id.

share|improve this answer
    
A single client can have many problems, so I need to identify the problems also – Amoeba Jul 17 '13 at 17:46
    
You should still be OK with the only problem_id as the primary key. Just create a "regular" index on the client_id column (Gilbert Le Blanc's answer suggests this as well) and any query for problems by client should be super-fast. – Ed Gibbs Jul 17 '13 at 18:03

I suspect that you have to make problem_id the primary (clustering) key, and create another index on client_id. MySQL includes a reference to the primary key as a part of other indexes.

CREATE TABLE problem (
    problem_id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    client_id BIGINT(10) NOT NULL REFERENCES clients(client_id),
    status CHAR(1) NOT NULL,
    description VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
    start_date DATE NOT NULL,
    end_date DATE,
    PRIMARY KEY (problem_id)
    INDEX problem_ndx1 (client_id)
);
share|improve this answer
    
The problem_id must still be able to be used in WHERE clauses and so on, and a client_id is not enough to uniquely identify the rows. Will that still work? – Amoeba Jul 17 '13 at 17:49
    
@Amoeba: A WHERE clause with the client_id, problem_id (in that order) will use the problem_ndx1 index I defined to return one row. A WHERE clause with just the client_id will return all the problem rows. If the order is important, add start_date descending to the problem_ndx1 index. – Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 17 '13 at 17:55
    
I haven't used indexes before. So a single problem row is still uniquely identifiable by the combination of problem_id and client_id? – Amoeba Jul 17 '13 at 17:56
    
@Amoeba: Yes. A single problem row is uniquely identifiable by the combination of client_id and problem_id. – Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 17 '13 at 17:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.