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I am having a bit of trouble filtering data with pandas NAs. I have a data frame looking like this:

        Jan       Feb       Mar       Apr       May June
0  0.349143  0.249041  0.244352       NaN  0.425336  NaN
1  0.530616  0.816829       NaN  0.212282  0.099364  NaN
2  0.713001  0.073601  0.242077  0.553908  NaN       NaN
3  0.245295  0.007016  0.444352  0.515705  0.497119  NaN
4  0.195662  0.007249       NaN  0.852287  NaN       NaN

and I need to filter out the rows that have "holes". I think of the rows as time series, and by a hole I mean NAs in the middle of the series, but not at the end. I.e. in the data frame above, lines 0, 1 and 4 have holes, but 2 and 3 do not (having NAs only at the end of the row).

The only way I could think of so far is something like this:

for rowindex, row in df.iterrows():
    # now step through each entry in the row 
    # and after encountering the first NA, 
    # check if all subsequent values are NA too.

But I was hoping that there might be a less convoluted and more efficient way to do it.

Thanks, Anne

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you say, looping (iterrows) is a last resort. Try this, which uses apply with axis=1 instead of iterating through rows.

In [19]: def holey(s):
    starts_at = s.notnull().argmax()
    next_null = s[starts_at:].isnull().argmax()
    if next_null == 0:
        return False
    any_values_left = s[next_null:].notnull().any()
    return any_values_left
   ....: 

In [20]: df.apply(holey, axis=1)
Out[20]: 
0     True
1     True
2    False
3    False
4     True
dtype: bool

And now you can filter like df[~df.apply(holey, axis=1)].

A handy idiom here: use argmax() to find the first occurrence of True in a Series of boolean values.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, Dan, this works (although I had to be a bit careful with argmax on an all-false array). –  Anne Jul 18 '13 at 13:14

Here is another way using NumPy. It is faster because it uses NumPy functions on the underlying array as a whole, rather than applying a Python function to each row individually:

import io
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

content = '''\
        Jan       Feb       Mar       Apr       May June
   0.349143  0.249041  0.244352       NaN  0.425336  NaN
   0.530616  0.816829       NaN  0.212282  0.099364  NaN
   0.713001  0.073601  0.242077  0.553908  NaN       NaN
   0.245295  0.007016  0.444352  0.515705  0.497119  NaN
   0.195662  0.007249       NaN  0.852287  NaN       NaN'''

df = pd.read_table(io.BytesIO(content), sep='\s+')

def remove_rows_with_holes(df):
    nans = np.isnan(df.values)
    # print(nans)
    # [[False False False  True False  True]
    #  [False False  True False False  True]
    #  [False False False False  True  True]
    #  [False False False False False  True]
    #  [False False  True False  True  True]]

    # First index (per row) which is a NaN
    nan_index = np.argmax(nans, axis=1)
    # print(nan_index)
    # [3 2 4 5 2]

    # Last index (per row) which is not a NaN
    h, w = nans.shape
    not_nan_index = w - np.argmin(np.fliplr(nans), axis=1)
    # print(not_nan_index)
    # [5 5 4 5 4]

    mask = nan_index >= not_nan_index
    # print(mask)
    # [False False  True  True False]

    # print(df[mask])
    #         Jan       Feb       Mar       Apr       May  June
    # 2  0.713001  0.073601  0.242077  0.553908       NaN   NaN
    # 3  0.245295  0.007016  0.444352  0.515705  0.497119   NaN
    return df[mask]

def holey(s):
    starts_at = s.notnull().argmax()
    next_null = s[starts_at:].isnull().argmax()
    if next_null == 0:
        return False
    any_values_left = s[next_null:].notnull().any()
    return any_values_left

def remove_using_holey(df):
    mask = df.apply(holey, axis=1)
    return df[~mask]

Here are the timeit results:

In [78]: %timeit remove_using_holey(df)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.53 ms per loop

In [79]: %timeit remove_rows_with_holes(df)
10000 loops, best of 3: 85.6 us per loop

The difference becomes more dramatic as the number of rows in the DataFrame increases:

In [85]: df = pd.concat([df]*100)

In [86]: %timeit remove_using_holey(df)
1 loops, best of 3: 1.29 s per loop

In [87]: %timeit remove_rows_with_holes(df)
1000 loops, best of 3: 440 us per loop

In [88]: 1.29 * 10**6 / 440
Out[88]: 2931.818181818182
share|improve this answer
    
very interesting solution. Haven't tried it yet but I am very curious to understand the speed improvement. Why is your code so much faster than using the dataframe.apply method? –  Anne Jul 18 '13 at 13:16
    
Applying still operates on a row-by-row basis (but it's faster than building a Series from each row using iterrows). @unutbu applies the same functions to the entire array at once, which is faster. It's not always possible to find a solution that works that way, but this is one. :- ) –  Dan Allan Jul 18 '13 at 13:32

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