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I am having a dynamic cast fail on a g++ compiler (Redhat 5.5 gcc version 3.4.6) that works fine on a Windows Visual studio 2003, 2005, and 2010 compiler. To understand what I am seeing I will try to quickly break the problem down. We have a process that loads in numerous "plugins" from a directory and dynamically loads these plugins (which are dynamically linked libraries). The process is supposed to compare different rules and data types to return an answer. To make the process modulure we made the process understand about a "BaseDataType" but not about the actual specific types (so we could keep the process generic). The flow of the program goes something like this:

All our "SpecifcObject" types inherit from "BaseDataType" like this

class SpecificObject : public virtual BaseDataType {

   ... Class Items ...
}

This is the code from the process looks like:

// Receive raw data 
void receive_data(void *buff, int size,DataTypeEnum type)
{
   // Get the plugin associated with this data
   ProcessPlugin *plugin = m_plugins[type];

   // Since we need to cast the data properly into its actual type and not its
   // base data type we need the plugin to cast it for us (so we can keep the 
   // process generic)
   BaseDataType *data = plugin->getDataObject(buff);
   if(data)
   {
     // Cast worked just fine 
     .... Other things happen (but object isn't modified) ....
     // Now compare our rule
     RuleObject obj = getRule();
     ResultObject *result = plugin->CompareData(obj,data);
     if(result)
        ... Success Case ...
     else
        ... Error Case ...
   } 
}

Now this is (generically) what a plugin would look like

BaseDataType* ProcessPluginOne::getDataObject(unsigned char *buff)
{
    // SpecificObject inherits from BaseDataType using a "virtual" inheritance
    SpecificObject *obj = reinterpret_cast<SpecificObject*>(buff);
    if(obj)
       return (BaseDataType*)obj;
    else
       return NULL;
}

ResultObject* ProcessPluginOne::CompareData(RuleObject rule, BaseDataType *data)
{
   ResultObject *obj = NULL;
   // This method checks out fine
   if(data->GetSomeBaseMethod())
   {
      // This cast below FAILS every time in gcc but passes in Visual Studio
      SpecificObject *obj = dynamic_cast<SpecificObject*>(data);
      if(obj)
      { 
           ... Do Something ...
      }
   }

   return result;
}

Again all of this works under Visual Studio but not under GCC. To debug the program I started adding some code to different sections. I finally got it to work once I did the following in the main process (see added code below):

// In process with Modification
void receive_data(void *buff, int size,DataTypeEnum type)
{
   // Get the plugin associated with this data
   ProcessPlugin *plugin = m_plugins[type];

   // Since we need to cast the data properly into its actual type and not its
   // base data type we need the plugin to cast it for us (so we can keep the 
   // process generic)
   BaseDataType *data = plugin->getDataObject(buff);
   if(data)
   {
     // Cast worked just fine 
     .... Other things happen (but object isn't modified) ....
     // Now compare our rule
     RuleObject obj = getRule();

     /** I included the specific data types in as headers for debugging and linked in 
      * all the specific classes and added the following code
      */
     SpecificObject *test_obj = dynamic_cast<SpecificObject*>(data);
     if(test_obj)
        cout << "Our was Data was casted correctly!" << endl;
     /// THE CODE ABOVE FIXES THE BAD CAST IN MY PLUGIN EVEN THOUGH 
     /// THE CODE ABOVE IS ALL I DO


     ResultObject *result = plugin->CompareData(obj,data);
     if(result)
        ... Success Case ...
     else
        ... Error Case ...
   } 
}

Significant Process Compile Options:

Compile: -m64 -fPIC -wno-non-template-friend -DNDEGBUG -I <Includes>
Link: -Wl -z muldefs -m64

Significant Plugin Compile Options

Compile: -Wall -wno-non-template-friend -O -O2
Link: -Wl -Bstatic -Bdynamic -z muldefs -shared -m64

Since I am not modifying the object "data" I have no idea why the rest of the program would suddenly start working. The only thing I can think of is that the virtual table is getting stripped off somewhere in the process and the "extra" dynamic cast forces the main process to keep the table (which still doesn't make a lot of sense).

I have tried taking out all optimization settings in gcc and its still the same. Any thoughts as to what is going on here?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What is the actual code and calling code for getDataObject? As you've posted, the code can't compile (void* doesn't automatically cast to unsigned char*) –  Mark B Jul 17 '13 at 17:51
    
Sorry... Its actually just unsigned char* not void* That was a typo. I have confirmed that inside of the getDataObject the reinterpret cast works just fine and it appears to be a valid SpecificObject. The actual code inside of getDataObject looks exactly as posted (minus the void* typo). –  Nashirak Jul 17 '13 at 18:47
    
GCC 3.4.6 is a very ancient version of GCC (2004). Current version is 4.8.1, it performs better (better diagnostics, better optimization, better standard conformance). please upgrade your GCC compiler –  Basile Starynkevitch Jul 17 '13 at 20:36
    
I could if I would, but my program has to run on a legacy box. If this is a idiosyncrasy of 3.4.6, then my work around should suffice with the acknowledgement that when the system my program is attached to get upgraded, this "hack" gets taken out. –  Nashirak Jul 17 '13 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

The two most likely scenarios are that BaseDataType is not a polymorphic type, or that the compiler doesn't see the relationship between BaseDataType and SpecificObject at some point in the code (for example, in getDataObject the compiler might generate different code depending on knowledge of the parent-child relationship, since you use C-cast from child to parent. This is super easy to check: Change the C-cast to static_cast. If it fails to compile you're missing a critical include.

share|improve this answer
    
Since we use BaseDataType in other areas and haven't had any problems (just not this exact flow). I can say that BaseDataType is polymorphic. I tried the static_cast and it compiled just fine. I am convinced I am either compiling something wrong (missing an option or bad mix of options) or (unlikely but possible) there is a compiler bug in this gcc version. –  Nashirak Jul 17 '13 at 18:31

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