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void test(int x[static 10]);  

int main()  
{  
    int a[]={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11};  
    test(a);  
    return 0;  
}  

void test(int x[static 10])  
{  
    printf("%d",x[9]);  
} 

I was looking for bizarre C statements. I found this one, But could not understand what is the use of static 10 in that statement. Is it same as int x[10]?

Another thing, you can use volatile also, in place of static e.g int x[volatile 10]
Anybody knows what is the use of this kinda declaration?

PS: Compiled using GCC 4.6.3,

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marked as duplicate by Eric Petroelje, Nawaz, mc10, KillianDS, Mikhail Jul 17 '13 at 18:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
I've seen this question before. –  chris Jul 17 '13 at 18:05
2  
link please, i searched before posting. –  Akash Shende Jul 17 '13 at 18:07
1  
@AkashShende stackoverflow.com/questions/3430315/… –  EAGER_STUDENT Jul 17 '13 at 18:08
    
@EricPetroelje Seems your fingers are faster than mine –  EAGER_STUDENT Jul 17 '13 at 18:09
1  
one more stackoverflow.com/questions/3693429/… –  EAGER_STUDENT Jul 17 '13 at 18:11

1 Answer 1

It's a hint for the compiler telling that the x pointer parameter points to the first element of an array of at least 10 elements.

For example:

test(NULL);  // undefined behavior
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is this valid C++? how useful is it in the optimization (ie like inline or better?) - just trying to get more info, thanks –  im so confused Jul 17 '13 at 18:08
    
yeah, but program run without error, warning even if provided arguments are NOT at least 10 –  Akash Shende Jul 17 '13 at 18:08
    
@ChrisCM see my example, passing a NULL argument is undefined behavior. –  ouah Jul 17 '13 at 18:09
    
hm.. @ouah as in, compile time check? how does it differ from passing NULL into (int x[]) ? –  im so confused Jul 17 '13 at 18:11
1  
@AK4749 regarding C++, to my knowledge this feature does not exist in C++ –  ouah Jul 17 '13 at 18:12

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