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I'm having trouble setting up a simple boundary.

I've set up a minimum and maximum boundary using this code here.

def min3(n,m,o):
    if (n<m<o or n<o<m):
        return(m)
    elif (o<m<n or o<n<m):
        return(o)

def max3(n,m,o):
    if (n>m>o or n>o>m):
        return(n)
    elif (m>n>o or m>o>n):
        return(m)
    elif (o>m>n or o>n>m):
        return(o)

This code does not print any values onto my terminal, but if I use:

def min3(n,m,o):
    if (n<m<o or n<o<m):
        return("The minimum value is",n)

then the values returned get printed in the terminal as "The minimum value is n", which seems like I'm moving along nicely with the program.

BUT, when I actually enter the boundary code, which is:

def Boundaries(a,x,b):
    if (x < a):
        return False
    elif(x >=a and x<= b):
        return True

then run the program as usual, python3 complains saying

"unorderable types: int() < tuple()"

and I can't figure out how to either make "x" into a tuple, or make "a" into an integer.

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What are the arguments you're passing to these functions? It would help if you can describe these more. When I run Boundaries from terminal, if I send all integer values, I receive either a True or False output. –  David Zemens Jul 17 '13 at 18:33
    
I also receive a None type from the second min3 function, e.g., print min3(10,5,11) yields None. It seems perhaps that your logic is not accounting for all possible else conditions. –  David Zemens Jul 17 '13 at 18:41
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3 Answers 3

Does this work how you expect?

def Boundaries(a,x,b):
    return True if a <= x <= b else False
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This is kind of confusing, why not just use the min and max functions?

min(1,2,3) 
> 1

max(1,2,3)
> 3

And for your boundaries function

def boundaries(a, x, b):
    if a <= x <= b:
         return True
    return False #else
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First, it seems like you have input a tuple a, which means somewhere in your code you have:

a = ("something, prob. numbers", )

or

a = "something",

Now, to solve your problem, the most straight forward way is a one line function:

def boundaries(a, x, b):
    return a <= x and x <= b

If the expression evaluates to be False, we return false. Many programmers usually forget the fact that condition is itself a boolean value.

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