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I'm trying to parse data from XML files like

<level>
  <bg>details1</bg>
  <bg>details2</bg>
</level>

With xml.find(bg) I can only get details 1 out. It's because xml.find Returns the first (sub-)table which matches the search condition or nil.

If I want to read both bg out. How could I achieve it in LuaXML? Or please introduce other Lua XML library works.

Addons My real scenario is like this

<a>
   <b>
    <level>
      <bg>details1</bg>
    </level>
    <level>
      <bg>details2</bg>
    </level>
   </b>
</a>

I know I need to get whole b object out and use xml.tag to read level out. But my attempts fail. Could you help me on this code?


I finally get my solution like this based on Mike Corcoran's suggestion.

require 'luaxml'

local text = [[
<a>
   <bcde>
    <level>
      <bg>details1</bg>
    </level>
    <level>
      <bg>details2</bg>
    </level>
   </bcde>
</a>
]]

local txml = xml.eval(text)
for _, node in pairs(txml:find("bcde")) do
 if node.TAG ~= nil then
        if node[node.TAG] == "level" then
            local bg = node:find("bg")
                if bg ~= nil then
                for i=1, #bg do
                    print( bg[i])
                end
            end
        end
    end
end

There are too many layers and seems slow.. Any suggestion to improve efficiency?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just iterate over all children of the level tag (unless there is other information in there you aren't telling us about that needs to be filtered)

require 'luaxml'

local text = [[
<level>
    <bg>details1</bg>
    <bg>details2</bg>
</level>
]]

local VALUE = 1

local txml = xml.eval(text)
for _, node in pairs(txml:find("level")) do
    if node.TAG ~= nil then
        print(node[VALUE])
    end
end

and if you need to filter out everything except for the <bg> tags, you can just slightly modify the loop to this:

for _, node in pairs(txml:find("level")) do
    if node.TAG ~= nil then
        if node[node.TAG] == "bg" then
            print(node[VALUE])
        end
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
where could I find node data type doc? I cannot find it in LuaXML website. –  Decula Jul 17 '13 at 20:16
    
@Decula node's not a data type from luaxml. It's just a variable used in the loop example so it can be referred to inside the loop. You could have just named it children, value or something else. –  greatwolf Jul 17 '13 at 20:20
    
@greatwolf thanks for the inform. I mean I want to know luaxml object data type..... There is object.TAG. I want know what extra attributes I can use –  Decula Jul 17 '13 at 20:36
    
@Decula I've added more details to my response for your scenario. –  greatwolf Jul 17 '13 at 20:47
    
@Decula TAG is a variable declared in the LuaXml.lua file that gets included with any object that is returned by the library. it is just defined as a variable with value 0 (the position the tag always in, in returned tables from the library, value at position 1 is the inner text in the tag. –  Mike Corcoran Jul 18 '13 at 12:48

After calling xml.load you get back a table that represents the xml file just loaded. You can get to a specific node by accessing its corresponding numerical index in the table:

require 'luaxml'

local level = xml.load('level.xml')

-- level[1] == <bg>details1</bg>
-- level[2] == <bg>details2</bg>
for i = 1, #level do
  print(level[i])
end

Edit: From your edited question, here's one way to pull the data out of the xml file:

require 'luaxml'

local xmlroot = xml.load('your.xml')
local b = xmlroot:find 'b'

for level = 1, #b do
  print(b[level][1][1])
end

If you have control over the xml format you can modify it somewhat to make the parse more readable:

<a>
   <b>
    <level bg="details1"> </level>
    <level bg="details2"> </level>
   </b>
</a>

With this change bg becomes an attribute of the level node. This reduces one level of indirection. To access bg attribute just use the lua . operator with bg as the key. The parsing loop can then be modified to:

for level = 1, #b do
  print(b[level].bg)
end
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much! It's a great luaxml object tutorial. But Mike Corcoran really solved my problem. Shall I open a new post asking for luaxml object explanation? I think it will be easier for other people to search. –  Decula Jul 17 '13 at 21:30

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