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I'd like to write a template function

template <typename T>
void f( T v );

such that v will be passed by value if it's small enough, otherwise by reference-to-const. For this, I used a little helper

template <typename T, bool>
struct parameter_helper;

template <typename T>
struct parameter_helper<T, true> {
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct parameter_helper<T, false> {
    typedef const T& type;
};

template <typename T>
struct parameter {
    typedef typename parameter_helper<T, sizeof(T) <= sizeof(void*)>::type type;
};

in the past such that I can have

template <typename T>
void f( typename parameter<T>::type v );

Now, in C++11: does this kind of helper template still make sense, or is there a better way to achieve the same effect? Is there maybe a ready-made template already? I checked <type_traits> but couldn't spot anything which seemed relevant.

share|improve this question
7  
See also: boost::call_traits::param_type. – kennytm Jul 17 '13 at 18:55
5  
You may want to add std::is_trivially_copyable to the condition to pass by-copy. Other than that you may have a nasty surprise with a class that contains a pointer to a big struct and does a deep copy in the copy constructor. – rodrigo Jul 17 '13 at 18:59
    
@KennyTM: There is a differnce there. The traits in boost do more work than the proposal here, which makes it actually useful... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '13 at 19:00
    
Be careful with polymorphic types: passing a base polymorphic class by value slices the object and make it loose its polymorphic behavior. Rodrigo's suggestion (to add std::is_trivially_copyable) also tackles this issue. Finally you might be interested in this proposal that adds a new language feature to deal with this problem. – Cassio Neri Jul 18 '13 at 7:56
up vote 13 down vote accepted

With C++11 you can define an alias template and save yourself some typing.

template<typename T> 
using parameter_t = typename parameter<T>::type;

and then use it as

template <typename T>
void f( parameter_t<T> v ); 

AFAIK, there's nothing built into the standard library for this. Also, you will lose template argument deduction implementing such a trait, which, in my opinion, reduces its utility greatly.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for template argument deduction issues introduced by the suggested approach – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '13 at 19:18
    
+1: The using type is nice, but can you maybe add a few words about what template argument deduction is and how this little helper breaks it? – Frerich Raabe Jul 18 '13 at 14:50
    
@FrerichRaabe If you call the function as f(42), T will not be deduced as int, so you need to resort to f<int>(42). Deduction doesn't happen because the standard states that referring to a nested name like the one in question is a non-deduced context. – Praetorian Jul 18 '13 at 15:04

I don't think there is anything new in C++11 to this regard, but...

My recommendation is to actually internalize the basic rules and use them directly. There are cases where even if the type is less than 4 bytes you might want to pass by const reference (the function is going to store the reference for later and although it should not change the field it needs to access the updated value).

On the opposite direction if the function is going to make a copy anyways you might want to pass by value so that the copy is done in the interface and the copy can be elided or changed into a move operation, potentially reducing the cost of the operation.

share|improve this answer

I'd like to write a template function

template <typename T>
void f( T v );

such that v will be passed by value if it's small enough, otherwise by reference-to-const.

The compiler can be smart enough to do the right thing without any template magic, especially if the function f can be inlined. I would always implement f as

template <typename T> 
void f(const T& v);

and trust the compiler to turn that into a copy if the copy is cheaper.

Here is an example:

extern volatile int k;
extern volatile int m;

static void f(const int& j) noexcept { // or f(const int j)
   for (int i=0; i<j; ++i) {
    m = i;
  }
}

void g() noexcept {
  int j = k;
  f(j);
}

I ran clang++ -O3 -std=c++11 -S -emit-llvm filename.cpp and the generated assembly (as far as I can tell) is the same.

Pass by reference:

@k = external global i32
@m = external global i32

; Function Attrs: nounwind uwtable
define void @_Z1gv() #0 {
entry:
  %0 = load volatile i32* @k, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %cmp3.i = icmp sgt i32 %0, 0
  br i1 %cmp3.i, label %for.body.i, label %_ZL1fRKi.exit

for.body.i:                                       ; preds = %entry, %for.body.i
  %i.04.i = phi i32 [ %inc.i, %for.body.i ], [ 0, %entry ]
  store volatile i32 %i.04.i, i32* @m, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %inc.i = add nsw i32 %i.04.i, 1
  %exitcond = icmp eq i32 %inc.i, %0
  br i1 %exitcond, label %_ZL1fRKi.exit, label %for.body.i

_ZL1fRKi.exit:                                    ; preds = %for.body.i, %entry
  ret void
}

Pass by value:

@k = external global i32
@m = external global i32

; Function Attrs: nounwind uwtable
define void @_Z1gv() #0 {
entry:
  %0 = load volatile i32* @k, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %cmp3.i = icmp sgt i32 %0, 0
  br i1 %cmp3.i, label %for.body.i, label %_ZL1fi.exit

for.body.i:                                       ; preds = %entry, %for.body.i
  %i.04.i = phi i32 [ %inc.i, %for.body.i ], [ 0, %entry ]
  store volatile i32 %i.04.i, i32* @m, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %inc.i = add nsw i32 %i.04.i, 1
  %exitcond.i = icmp eq i32 %inc.i, %0
  br i1 %exitcond.i, label %_ZL1fi.exit, label %for.body.i

_ZL1fi.exit:                                      ; preds = %for.body.i, %entry
  ret void
}

If f is not inlined then the assembly is different though.

share|improve this answer
    
But if you cannot inline f then it is most likely not the parameter passing that is expensive so it doesn't matter anyway whether you pass by value or by const reference. Not true. You can have a std::string holding say 100M of text, and a function that loops through it (say to find a substring, involving two loops which most probably trips the heuristics of when it can/cannot be inlined). The copy can be much more expensive than the actual search. Same thing happens if the function calls itself recursively, which will effectively disable inlining, and yet the cost of copying dominates – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '13 at 21:27
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas OK, thanks, learned something new today. Could you give me the code showing the use case (preferably with the first, string example)? – Ali Jul 17 '13 at 21:33
    
bool locate(const std::string& needle, const std::string& stack) { for (int i = 0; i < stack.size()-needle.size(); ++i) { bool found = true; for (int j = 0; j < needle.size() && i+j < stack.size(); ++j) { if (needle[j] != stack[i+j]) { found = false; break; } } if (found) return true; } } or something similar, the outer loop checks all possible places where needle could start, the inner loop checks if the substring at that location is the same as needle. I would not implement this as is, but this is just one example of a function that cannot be inlined. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '13 at 22:12
    
Additionally, if you take a pointer to function and call the function through that so that you call the out of line definition, the argument will be either copied or not and the same thing would happen. void f(std::string x) { std::cout << x; } void (*fn)(std::string) = &f; fn(large_string); In that last piece, large_string will be copied, causing an unnecessary dynamic allocation, a copy (probably optimized to memcpy, but non-negligible if large_string is really large. (The same effect can be seen if you use dynamic dispatch through a polymorphic hierarchy (i.e. virtual function) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 17 '13 at 22:13
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas As for the locate example, clang still happily inlines it. As for the second one, I don't understand. I would always implement f as template <class T> f(const T& arg) and trust the compiler to turn that into template <class T> f(const T arg) only if the copy is cheaper. I don't see how we arrive at the situation you are writing in your second example. I accept the fact that there might be use cases where it could matter and the compiler is not smart enough to figure out the right thing. Thanks for pointing out my mistake. – Ali Jul 17 '13 at 22:49

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