Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Bear with me as I dump the following simplified code: (I will describe the problem below.)

class CMyClass
{
    ...
private:
 HRESULT ReadAlpha(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b);
 HRESULT ReadBeta(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b);

 typedef HRESULT (CMyClass::*ReadSignature)(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b);

 HRESULT TryFormats(ReadSignature ReadFormat, PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant);
};


inline HRESULT CMyClass::ReadAlpha(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b)
{
 if (b)
 {
     // got a valid Base. Handle generic stuff here.
     SetStuff(pPropVariant, b->someInt);
     return S_OK;
 }

 return (b != NULL) ? 0 : -1;
}

inline HRESULT CMyClass::ReadBeta(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b)
{
 if (b)
 {
  SomeLib::FormatA *fa;
  SomeLib::FormatB *fb;

  if ( fa = dynamic_cast<SomeLib::FormatA*>( b ) )
  {
   // specific code for FormatA
   SetStuff(pPropVariant, fa->getVersion());
   return S_OK;
  }
  else if ( fb = dynamic_cast<SomeLib::FormatB*>( b ) )
  {
   // specific code for FormatB
   SetStuff(pPropVariant, fb->valueForB);
   return S_OK;
  }
 }

 return (b != NULL) ? 0 : -1;
}

inline HRESULT CMyClass::TryFormats(ReadSignature ReadFormat, PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant)
{
 HRESULT hr;
 if (FAILED(hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, _pFile->formatA())))
  if (FAILED(hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, _pFile->formatC())))
   hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, _pFile->formatD());

 return hr;
}

I end up calling this code like:

hr = TryFormats(&CMyClass::ReadAlpha, pPropVar);

Now... the problem is that this is too generic and constrained, especially now that I am trying to refactor this code for use in some other projects. So, this means that I want to place the ReadXxx code in another source file and abuse templating somehow. The TryFormats remains in the class since different classes have different formats they attempt to read.

My current approach is bound to fail due to the dynamic_cast<Derived*> needed for functionality that is not in the Base class, and since I may need to read up to 5 different formats in one class, I really don't want to drag in formats I do not need in the first place. (For example, see above how CMyClass does not support SomeLib::FormatB, yet the ReadBeta() needs to support it and thus forces the compiler to compile all the relevant information in.) In total, I have around 10 different formats I 'support' like this.

How can I properly refactor this code? I don't want to need to rewrite Base functionality for every descendant, nor do I want to put derived specific information into a function that simply takes a Base.

I have tried some things, but all I manage to squeeze out of my compiler are rainbows of errors. Rather than confuse the people here with my attempts, I figured I'd give my (simplified) original working code and allow the experts to draw their own conclusions on how to do this. In reality, there's about 50 of those ReadXxx functions, but they either follow the general structure of the ReadAlpha or ReadBeta functions above. So if someone can show me how to do those, I can without an issue convert my actual code. (I imagine I will need to change TryFormats() definition as well, and that's no problem either - I am just hoping someone can show me how to do get the above example refactored properly.)

Thank you, and my apologies for the long, long question.

share|improve this question
    
see my update to your comment. Hope that helps. –  Doug T. Nov 20 '09 at 15:13
1  
Words you don't often see in the same sentence: too generic and constrained –  Loki Astari Nov 20 '09 at 16:33
    
@Doug: the more ideas the better! :) @Martin York: So true. Still, they both apply to me. The root of the problem as I see it is in the descendants having been started out pretty uniformly for the primary points of interest, but secondary (more specific) sources of information have not been considered for the design at all... making getting such information regardless of the format a real mess. –  Stigma Nov 20 '09 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, my previous visitor approach is a history. I am going to post you entire text of small working program that you can play with. Assuming that

_pFile->formatA()
_pFile->formatC()
_pFile->formatD()

All declared as

FormatA* formatA()
FormatC* formatC()
FormatD* formatD()

In other words return type is known at compile time, this templatized approach may work for you. And it involves neither function pointers nor dynamic downcasting

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// this section is for testing
class   Base	
{
public:
    void ExecuteBase()
    {
    	cout << "Executing Base" << endl;
    }
};

class   FormatA	:	public Base
{
public:
    void	ExecuteAAlpha()
    {
    	cout << "Executing A Alpha" << endl;
    }

    void	ExecuteABeta()
    {
    	cout << "Executing A Beta" << endl;
    }
};

class   FormatB : public Base
{
public:
    void	ExecuteBAlpha()
    {
    	cout << "Executing B Alpha" << endl;
    }

    void	ExecuteBBeta()
    {
    	cout << "Executing B Beta" << endl;
    }
};

FormatA* GetFormatA()
{
    static FormatA cl;
    return &cl;
}

FormatB* GetFormatB()
{
    static FormatB cl;
    return &cl;
}
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////




//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// now begins real code
struct AlphaReader  {};
struct BetaReader {};
template <typename READER_TYPE> struct TypeConverter	{};


class   MyClass
{
public:
    template <typename READER_TYPE>
    int	TryFormats(const READER_TYPE&)
    {
    	TryFormatsImplementation(TypeConverter<READER_TYPE>(), GetFormatA());
    	TryFormatsImplementation(TypeConverter<READER_TYPE>(), GetFormatB());

    	return 0;
    }

private:
    int		TryFormatsImplementation(const TypeConverter<AlphaReader>&, Base* pFormat)
    {
    	// here you will call you ReadAlpha which requires Base only
    	// code below is for testing

    	cout << "Executing Alpha Reader for Base" <<endl;
    	pFormat->ExecuteBase();
    	return 1;
    }

    int		TryFormatsImplementation(const TypeConverter<BetaReader>&, FormatA* pFormat)
    {
    	// here you will call you ReadBeta for FromatA,
    	// code below is for testing

    	cout << "Executing Beta Reader for FormatA" <<endl;
    	pFormat->ExecuteABeta();
    	return 3;
    }

    int		TryFormatsImplementation(const TypeConverter<BetaReader>&, FormatB* pFormat)
    {
    	// here you will call you ReadBeta for FromatB,
    	// code below is for testing

    	cout << "Executing Beta Reader for FormatB" <<endl;
    	pFormat->ExecuteBBeta();
    	return 4;
    }
};


int main()
{
    MyClass cl;

    cl.TryFormats(AlphaReader());
    cl.TryFormats(BetaReader());

    cin.get();
}

After I run this program I get following output which is correct:

Executing Alpha Reader for Base
Executing Base
Executing Alpha Reader for Base
Executing Base
Executing Beta Reader for FormatA
Executing A Beta
Executing Beta Reader for FormatB
Executing B Beta
share|improve this answer
    
It is way too late in the evening for me to play with this code right this moment. However, a quick glance seems to say it is precisely what I am looking for. One more question (that I could likely easily test when I have had some rest, but it cannot hurt to ask it here).. it should be rather simple to take the implementations out of the class and leave just TryFormats() in there, correct? I'll see in the morning how this trick with those structs works. It seems you are calling them somehow AlphaReader()? Interesting! –  Stigma Nov 20 '09 at 22:48
    
Yes, nothing says that TryFormatsImplementation must be class member. These are just a bunch of overloaded functions. The key is for compiler to be able to select which function to call at compile time (overloaded resolution is static). –  BostonLogan Nov 20 '09 at 23:21
    
Okay, so I can't sleep just yet, since this problem continues to occupy my mind. I was wondering.. templates only get applied once a type can be extrapolated, so how does it work here? I might test tomorrow if I can think of a good way to test it... but suppose I was to remove/comment out the line about FormatB in the TryFormat function in your example, would it indeed not compile/link the stuff relevant to FormatB? Or does it always include all formats? I can imagine the latter happening with your trickery (which I can't fully grasp yet). –  Stigma Nov 21 '09 at 0:33
1  
This is more general thing with static libraries and wether your configuration allows smart static linking (usually it does). If library is linked statically, compiler will try to exclude all the corners of static libary that are not used by the application. Well, the problem usually - virtual functions in the library, at compile time compiler has no idea what function is actually needs to be called so it may not be able to optimize(it may still optimize parts of the library away though). AlphaRender() as function argument in fact will instanciate proper TryFormats function... to be continued –  BostonLogan Nov 21 '09 at 2:32
1  
In this contex AlphaReader() (when passed as function argument) will create temporary object and pass const referece to it in (but since compiler knows that object is not used inisde the function it may even not create it, so should not be performance degradation here). The purpose of AlphaReader() passed into the function is to instantiate it from the template. –  BostonLogan Nov 21 '09 at 2:35

Sorry for a long post.
One possible solution is to implement visitor pattern. Unfortunately it requires one time modification to you SomeLib, but after that you can expand its functionality without further modifications. In fact Visitor is a framework that supports Open/Close principle. Implement it once and you will be able to add functionality to your library without actual modification to the library itself.

Here is implementation sketch:
Declare new class in your SomeLib:

// visitor base class, acts as interface can not be instanciated.
// must be delared in SomeLib
class IVisitor
{
protected:
 IVisitor()   {}

public:
 // for all supported formats
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatA(SomeLib::FormatA& formatA) 
                                                       {return NoOperation();}
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatB(SomeLib::FormatB& formatB) 
                                                       {return NoOperation();}

private:
 HRESULT    NoOperation() {return 0;}
};

Every class in you SomeLib::base hierarchy must implement new virtual function:

virtual HRESULT Accept(IVisitor& visitor);

Implementation of Accept will be class specific:

HRESULT  FormatA::Accept(IVisitor& visitor)
{
 return visitor.OnVisitFormatA(*this);
}

HRESULT  FormatB::Accept(IVisitor& visitor)
{
 return visitor.OnVisitFormatB(*this);
}

Now we are done with changes to SomeLib Lets move to your application.
First we need to implement concrete visitor classes:

class CMyClass; // forward delare
class Visitor : public SomeLib::IVisitor
{
protected:
 Visitor(CMyClass* myclass, PROPVARIANT* propvariant) 
         : myclass_(myclass), propvariant_(propvariant)
 {
 };

protected:
 CMyClass* myclass_;
 PROPVARIANT* propvariant_
};

This is still non-instanciable class.
Now we need concrete classes for whatever read you happen to need.

class ReadAlphaVisitor : Visitor
{
public:
 ReadAlphaVisitor(CMyClass* myclass, PROPVARIANT* propvariant) 
            : Visitor(myclass, propvariant)
 {
 }

public:
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatA(SomeLib::FormatA& formatA)
                                                    {return ReadAlpha(formatA);}
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatB(SomeLib::FormatB& formatB) 
                                                    {return ReadAlpha(formatB);}

private:
 HRESULT   ReadAlpha(SomeLib::base& format)
 {
  myclass_->SetStuff(propvariant_, format.someInt);
  return S_OK;
 }
};

And another one:

class ReadBetaVisitor : Visitor
{
public:
 ReadBetaVisitor(CMyClass* myclass, PROPVARIANT* propvariant) 
                 : Visitor(myclass, propvariant)
 {
 }

public:
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatA(SomeLib::FormatA& formatA) 
                                                 {return ReadBetaFormatA(formatA);}
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatB(SomeLib::FormatB& formatB) 
                                                 {return ReadBetaFormatB(formatB);}

private:
 HRESULT   ReadBetaFormatA(SomeLib::FormatA& formatA)
 {
  myclass_->SetStuff(propvariant_, formatA.getVersion());
  return S_OK;
 }

 HRESULT   ReadBetaFormatB(SomeLib::FormatA& formatB)
 {
  myclass_->SetStuff(propvariant_, formatB.valueForB);
  return S_OK;
 }
};

And finally here is how MyClass will use them:

inline HRESULT CMyClass::ReadAlpha(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b)
{
 if( 0 != b )
 {
  ReadAlphaVisitor visitor(this, pPropVariant);
  return b->Accept(visitor);
 }

 return 0;
}

inline HRESULT CMyClass::ReadBeta(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, SomeLib::Base *b)
{
 if( 0 != b )
 {
  ReadBetaVisitor visitor(this, pPropVariant);
  return b->Accept(visitor);
 }

 return 0;
}

It scares me just to look at it :-)
It may be terribly overdesigned, but still a good exercise.

Update: To avoid including all the formats IVisitor can be redefined as follows:

class IVisitor
{
protected:
 IVisitor()   {}

public:
 // for all supported formats
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatA(SomeLib::base& formatA) 
                                                       {return NoOperation();}
 virtual HRESULT  OnVisitFormatB(SomeLib::base& formatB) 
                                                       {return NoOperation();}

private:
 HRESULT    NoOperation() {return 0;}
};

Then application that uses your lib would implement visitor and override only what is needed (OnVisitFormatA only), but then of course downcasting is involved (argh...) and we are back at the drawing board, this design does not avoid downcasting and goes into trash bin.

share|improve this answer
    
That is indeed a marvel of overdesigning. Nice job, though! :) But seriously.. I see a few 'flaws' compared to what I am looking for. First (which I admittedly only wrote in the comment to the other answer) is that I want to avoid changes to SomeLib. Second is (correct me if I am wrong) that it still implies compiling in every format and the libs needed to support it. Suppose a new app only needs to support FormatA, the compiler would still include all the other formats (plus dependancies) also. That is why I was looking towards templates (which I admittedly can't get working by myself.) –  Stigma Nov 20 '09 at 19:56

Updated from comment I would wrap SomeLib::Base in an adapter under your control. Give it 2 [pure] virtual methods one whos purpose is to provide the second argument to SetStuff, and second to return if a given method(?) -- ie alpha/beta -- is supported. And then also provide access to the underlying SomeLib:: class.

 class BaseAdapter
 {
 ...
 private:
     SomeLib::Base* m_concreteBase;
 public:
     virtual int SecondArgument(...) = 0; 
     virtual bool IsSupported(...) { return false;}

     SomeLib::Base* GetConcreteBase() {return m_concreteBase;}
 };

 class FormatAAdapter : public BaseAdapter
 {
     ...
     int SecondArgument(alphaOrBetaOrWhatever)
     {
         // return based on source function
     }

     bool IsSupported( alphaOrBetaOrWhatever )
     {
         // return true/false based on source function
     }
 }

 // Create a function to create one of each type of format, ensuring type safety
 virtual BaseAdapter* MakeBaseAdapter(SomeLib::FormatA* fa)
 {
        return new FormatAAdapter(fa)
 }

Then instead of

  SomeLib::FormatA *fa;
  SomeLib::FormatB *fb;

  if ( fa = dynamic_cast<SomeLib::FormatA*>( b ) )
  {
   // specific code for FormatA
   SetStuff(pPropVariant, fa->getVersion());
   return S_OK;
  }
  else if ( fb = dynamic_cast<SomeLib::FormatB*>( b ) )
  {
   // specific code for FormatB
   SetStuff(pPropVariant, fb->valueForB);
   return S_OK;
  }

You could do

 ReadBeta(PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant, BaseAdapter *b)
 {

    // specific code for FormatB
    if (b->IsSupported(beta))
    {
       SetStuff(pPropVariant, b->SecondArgument(beta));
       return S_OK;
    }
 }

In your calling code you would work through your adapters:

inline HRESULT CMyClass::TryFormats(ReadSignature ReadFormat, PROPVARIANT* pPropVariant)
{
 HRESULT hr;
 if (FAILED(hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, MakeBaseAdapter(_pFile->formatA())))
  if (FAILED(hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, MakeBaseAdapter(_pFile->formatC()))))
   hr = (this->*ReadFormat)(pPropVariant, MakeBaseAdapter(_pFile->formatD()));

 return hr;
}

Also, in response to

A good deal of Base descendants would not support that specific secondArgument, and if they did, it might be calculated. Using #IFDEFs would be a cleaner solution (but I prefer templates!)

You can either provide a default value for the secondArgument or provide a way through the base adapter to notify the user that the secondArgument is not available.

As an aside, when I hear "Refactoring function pointers to some form of templating" I think boost functions.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with that is that I need to modify SomeLib, which is something I want to avoid where possible. I already maintain a few minor patches in order for 64-bit compilation, but I do not want to take it any further than that for the simple purpose of being able to easily upgrade when new versions come out for whatever reason. In practice the difference is a bit larger than a single variable. A good deal of Base descendants would not support that specific secondArgument, and if they did, it might be calculated. Using #IFDEFs would be a cleaner solution (but I prefer templates!) –  Stigma Nov 20 '09 at 15:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.