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I'm passing the Type of an object as an argument in my constructor but I would like to constrain the type to be only objects that inherit from a specific interface.

public MyClass(Type myType);

I know I could check that the type inherits from the interface in the body of the method like so:

if(typeof(IMyInterface).IsAssignableFrom(myType))

But is type constraint for arguments possible?

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There's nothing in the C# world which would allow you to constrain an argument further, than just by it's type and inheritance. When you write a method which takes an int, it's also impossible to constrain the method to only accept numbers in the range of [0, 10] (by means of a nice syntax). What you want is to use PostSharp, CodeContracts, or something similar, which throws an exception when certain conditions are not met, for example when the Type object given does not implement a certain interface. You can always write this code yourself and just throw an ArgumentException in this case. –  Simon Jul 17 '13 at 19:36

2 Answers 2

Why wouldn't you make your class generic? In that case you can specify your constraint and not bother about checking the argument.

E.g.

public class MyClass<T>
    where T : IMyInterface
{
    ....
}
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Because you show code that checks the type at runtime, I assume that you want to enforce the type constraint at compile time:

public class MyClass<T> where T : IMyInterface {
    public MyClass(T myArg) {
        Type myType = typeof(T);
        Type argType = myArg.GetType();
        Debug.Assert(myType == argType, "types must be the same!");
    }
}

You can't do it in the constructor, but you can do it in the class declaration.

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