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The compiler doesn't come up with any errors...It is supposed to be a basic phonebook with 5 slots for people. For some reason everything seems to work but it doesn't save the information. What did I do wrong?

typedef struct contact{
  char fname[10];
  char lname[10];
  int pnumber;
};

struct contact p1;
struct contact p2;
struct contact p3;
struct contact p4;
struct contact p5;

int go =0;

int phonebook(struct contact person,int use);

int main(){
 while(go == 0){
   int contact;
   int choice;
   int location;

   printf("first what position in your contacts would you like to change?(1-5)\n");

   scanf("%d",&location);

   printf("what would you like to do?\n1. add a contact\n2. change a contact\n3. print  a 

   contact\n4. Quit\n");

   scanf("%d",&choice);

   switch(location){
    case 1:
     phonebook(p1,choice);
     break;
    case 2:
     phonebook(p2,choice);
     break;
    case 3:
     phonebook(p3,choice);
     break;
    case 4:
     phonebook(p4,choice);
     break;         
    case 5:
     phonebook(p5,choice);
     break;
    default:
     printf("that was not a valid option\n");
  } 
 }

 system("PAUSE");
 return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

int phonebook(struct contact person,int use){
  switch(use){
   case 1:
    if(person.pnumber>0){ 
      printf("you already have a contact there\n");
    }
    else{
      printf("What is the contact's first name?\n"); 
      scanf("%s", &person.fname);
      printf("\nWhat is the contact's last name?\n");
      scanf("%s", &person.lname);
      printf("\nWhat is the contact's phone number?\n");
      scanf("%d", &person.pnumber);
    }
   break;
  case 2:
   if(person.pnumber == 0)
     printf("No contact is saved in this position\n");
   else{
     printf("What is the contact's first name?\n"); 
     scanf("%s", &person.fname);
     printf("\nWhat is the contact's last name?\n");
     scanf("%s", &person.lname);
     printf("\nWhat is the contact's phone number?\n");
     scanf("%d", &person.pnumber);
   }
  break;     
 case 3:
  printf("\nName:%s\n%s \nNumber:%d \n",&person.fname,&person.lname,&person.pnumber);
  break;
 case 4:
  go = 1;
  break;
 default:
  printf("that wasn't an option. Please pick a valid option next time.\n");
 }

}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Paulpro, Andrew Barber Jul 18 '13 at 0:24

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Andrew Barber
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It would be great if you could narrow down the problem and reformat your code. Most people don't want to parse everything you have. –  squiguy Jul 17 '13 at 20:15
1  
If you want us to read all your code, can you please at least indent it properly. To help the reader you should also only keep or at least stress the relevant part of the code. –  hivert Jul 17 '13 at 20:16
    
1. What do you mean that it "does not save the information"? Please give an example of running your program and explain how the output differs from what you expect. 2. Please format your code with appropriate indentation and whitespace. –  Code-Apprentice Jul 17 '13 at 20:17
    
Sorry, I wasn't sure what was going wrong so I posted everything. The program I use has them all indented properly but the copy paste didn't get that, I do apologize. As far a not saving the information goes I do believe the answers posted were correct...still working on how to fix it though. –  user2592484 Jul 17 '13 at 20:22
    
re: "copy paste didn't get that" That's fine, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't reformat your code before you post. –  Dennis Meng Jul 17 '13 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have a simple problem: the C language uses "call by value", so your phonebook() function gets a copy of the struct. Then the phonebook() function changes the copy, but the changes aren't saved anywhere.

The way you fix this: you have to make your phonebook() function take a pointer to a struct, and then it can use the pointer to modify the struct.

int phonebook(struct contact *pcontact, int use)
{
    // ... stuff omitted ...

    printf("What is the contact's first name?\n");
    scanf("%s", pcontact->fname);  // "fname" works as a pointer

    printf("\nWhat is the contact's phone number?\n");
    scanf("%d", &pcontact->pnumber);  // must take address of integer "pnumber"

// ... rest of phonebook() omitted ...

// example of calling phonebook():
case 1:
    phonebook(&p1, choice);

http://www.lysator.liu.se/c/bwk-tutor.html#pointers

share|improve this answer
    
That makes a lot of sense, but I'm not sure how to go about fixing it. Pointers point to specific values of the struct, right? so would I have to send a different pointer for each value? –  user2592484 Jul 17 '13 at 20:23
1  
@user2592484 You can point to an entire struct. The whole struct will be in a contiguous section of memory and in fact C has the -> operator just for accessing members of a struct through a pointer to the struct. –  Paulpro Jul 17 '13 at 20:24
    
You need to pass the pointer to a specific struct that you want the phonebook() function to modify. I added an example showing the call. –  steveha Jul 17 '13 at 20:26
    
Also, in a real program, you will probably have your struct members in an array. I imagine that your next assignment will be to rewrite this one to use an array of struct values instead of declaring five different struct variables. –  steveha Jul 17 '13 at 20:27
1  
Doesn't scanf want the address of pnumber - a pointer to int here? –  Michael Dorgan Jul 17 '13 at 21:59

You are passing person by value, not by reference, so phonebook is making changes to a copy of the contact struct.

Try

int phonebook(struct contact *person,int use);
share|improve this answer
    
C does not have references. –  wildplasser Jul 17 '13 at 20:21
    
@wildplasser Yes, it does. –  Paulpro Jul 17 '13 at 20:23
    
Maybe you should ask the compiler, but the above function declaration is a syntax error in C. –  wildplasser Jul 17 '13 at 20:24
1  
C language doesn't have pass-by-reference concept. –  Mahesh Jul 17 '13 at 20:25
    
@Paulpro, maybe you are thinking of C++? In C, you have to do references yourself, using explicit pointers. The C compiler won't like the syntax in the example shown. –  steveha Jul 17 '13 at 20:28

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