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I'm working on an HTML project, and I can't find out how to open the link I want to open in a new tab without javascript.

I already know that <a href="http://www.WEBSITE_NAME.com"></a> opens the link in same tab. Any ideas how to make it open in a new one?

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possible duplicate of How can I open a link in new tab (and not new window)? –  Wex Jul 17 '13 at 22:12
3  
use <a href="url" target="_blank">...</a> –  Rohit Agrawal Jul 17 '13 at 22:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Set the 'target' attribute of the link to _blank:

<a href="#" target="_blank">Link</a>

Edit: for other examples, see here: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_a_target.asp

(Note: I previously suggested blank instead of _blank because, if used, it'll open a new tab and then use the same tab if the link is clicked again. However, this is only because, as GolezTrol pointed out, it refers to the name a of a frame/window, which would be set and used when the link is pressed again to open it in the same tab).

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The special targets all start with an underscore. blank would be the name of a frame or window. It may seem to work, because a new window or tab will probably be opened when none exists with the name 'blank', but a second click on the link should open the page in that same tab again instead of opening yet another one. –  GolezTrol Jul 17 '13 at 22:12
    
Hmm actually that's what I was thinking of indeed - I'd used blank before to achieve that functionality, though I suppose it shouldn't be recommended in the same way if it's not valid. –  SharkofMirkwood Jul 17 '13 at 22:16
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Well, I guess it isn't invalid, it's just different. Instead of blank you could just as well use foo, I think, while _blank actually has a special meaning. I can't find any information to prove otherwise. Can you? –  GolezTrol Jul 17 '13 at 22:18
    
No, I guess you're right. Invalid wasn't the right word, but I just meant that it doesn't mean anything in particular so I shouldn't have implied that it does. –  SharkofMirkwood Jul 17 '13 at 22:20

target='_blank' if you are not using XHTML.

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Use target="_blank":

<a href="http://www.example.com/" target="_blank">This will open in a new window!</a>
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Use the "target" attribute of the a tag and assign it to _blank. That is:

<a href="http://www.google.com" target="_blank" >Google in a New Tab or Window depending on the browser's capabilities</a>
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Use either of these as per your requirements

 <a href="xyz.html" target="_blank"> Link </a>
 <a href="xyz.html" target="_self"> Link </a>
 <a href="xyz.html" target="_parent"> Link </a>
 <a href="xyz.html" target="_top"> Link </a>
 <a href="xyz.html" target="framename"> Link </a>

where

_blank Opens the linked document in a new window or tab
_self Opens the linked document in the same frame as it was clicked (this is default)
_parent Opens the linked document in the parent frame
_top Opens the linked document in the full body of the window
framename Opens the linked document in a named frame

Source

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target="_blank" = always new tab for each click target="tabName" = new tab, but same for each click.

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