Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've basically been trying to make a menu for a game by using a JFrame and switching out 2 JPanels (one for the menu and one for the actual game). I'm trying to implement the most basic format I can think of but can't seem to get it to work. If anybody could explain what's wrong with the code I would appreciate it.

Here's my JFrame, menu panel, and ActionListener

package buttonMenu;

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Button;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Skeleton extends JFrame implements ActionListener{

JPanel menu;
JButton button;

public Skeleton(){

setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
setSize(400, 400);
setVisible(true);

menu = new JPanel();
button = new JButton("button");

menu.setSize(400, 400);
menu.setBackground(Color.BLACK);
menu.setVisible(true);
menu.add(button);

button.setLocation(200, 200);
button.addActionListener(this);

add(menu, BorderLayout.CENTER);

}

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent a){
    JPanel panel = Game.Game();
    this.remove(menu);
    this.add(panel);   
}

public static void main(String args[]){
    new Skeleton();
}
}

The actionPerformed calls the panel created in this class

package buttonMenu;
import java.awt.Color;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
public class Game{

public static JPanel Game(){
    JPanel panel = new JPanel();
    panel.setSize(400, 400);
    panel.setBackground(Color.WHITE);
    return panel;       
}

}

Again, if anybody could explain to me what's wrong with this code I would appreciate it. Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When adding/removing components, you will need to revalidate the parent container to force it to relay itself out...

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent a){
    JPanel panel = Game.Game();
    this.remove(menu);
    this.add(panel);   
    this.revalidate();
}

A better solution would be to use something like a CardLayout

Take a look at How to use CardLayout for more details

ps- I should add. You should avoid extending directly from JFrame, instead create your application entire on a base component, like a JPanel. When you need to display it, create an instance of JFrame and add the application component to it. This way your application becomes more flexible in terms of deployment and re-use

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice, I've never used revalidate but it's working now. Also, thanks for the link, it looks like the card layout is the way to go. – Corey Smith Jul 17 '13 at 23:34

Use validate() method to see the changes.

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent a){
    JPanel panel = Game.Game();
    this.remove(menu);
    this.add(panel);   
    this.validate();
}
share|improve this answer

What's wrong with my code may be kind of a vague question, but I'll sort some points:

  • extends JFrame: You're not really extending JFrame, you're just using one, as part of your GUI.
  • As other answers mention, you should revalidate() after adding/removing components.
  • menu.setVisible(true), usually this isn't needed.
  • Maybe not wrong, but I usually build all my interface first (ie, creating and adding the initial components), and only then set the dimensions and visibility of the frame.
  • You're running all that code in the main thread; Swing components aren't thread-safe. See Concurrency in Swing for more information on that.
  • I know this is for a game, but is absolute positioning in your panels really needed? Use Layout managers if possible (with an exception for your game panel, which will probably do only custom painting).
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, sorry about that, I just realized I forgot to specify what my code was doing. Thanks for the advice though, it's working now. – Corey Smith Jul 17 '13 at 23:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.