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I've gone into a project lately that requires two different methods for two different variable, but I need to store both of these values in order to use them in another function.

It's a bit complicated, so let me explain. I've got this switch statement that watches for several numbers: 2,3,13,45

var hello;
switch ($variable) {
    case 2:
        //do something irrelevant
        break;
    case 3:
        //do something irrelevant
        break;
    case 13:
        //do something with variable named "hello". Ex.:
        alert(hello);
        break;
    case 45:
        hello = "hello";
        break;
}

As you can see, I need to get the value of "hello", before the variable gets a value. I can't change the order, nor I can't change variable declaration, so I have to do something with this setup.

What I thought was to make a function call in 13:

function getMyVariable(variable) {
    var v = variable;
    return variable;
}

case 13:
    getMyVariable(hello);
    break;

Then of course the function would still return undefined.

What I'd like to do, is to make the function wait for the variable set in 45:

(note that this is just speculation, this code is no way near working)

case 45:
    hello = "hello";
    getMyVariable(hello);
    break;

function getMyVariable(variable) {
    //function gets call from case 13
    //if type is undefined, wait for a variable that isn't undefined
    //if variable isn't undefined return the variable
}

So basically at first call skip case 13, let case 45 set the variable, then go back to case 13 and execute the code here. Can you follow me? Tell me if you need more info!

share|improve this question
    
That's impossible. It's either case 13 or case 45, not both. –  Bergi Jul 17 '13 at 23:25
    
Could you please post the whole script? It's difficult to get the big picture of what you intend to do. What is passing these several numbers into the switch statement, and how? And why can't you just move the hello = "hello" assignment to the top, does it actually rely on something that happens in case 45? –  Bergi Jul 17 '13 at 23:27
    
I can't move the assignement, it does rely on something that only happens in case 45. Sadly, I can't post code, it's an enterprise project. :( –  Trisztán Thar Jul 17 '13 at 23:30
    
And the switch statement is executed twice (in a loop or somehow?) - please post at least that part - and case 13 happens before case 45? –  Bergi Jul 17 '13 at 23:35
    
"make the function wait for the variable set in 45" sounds like the observer pattern. Check this article. answers.oreilly.com/topic/… Second example might help. –  nickles80 Jul 17 '13 at 23:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
// this needs to be defined somewhere outside that it is preserved
// between calls to the code that contains `switch`
var doThisWhenHelloIsSet = [];

// ...
var hello;
switch ($variable) {
    // ...
    case 13:            
        doThisWhenHelloIsSet.push(function(h) {
            // do something with argument named "h" 
            // (which will have the value of variable named "hello").
            // Ex.:
            alert(h);
        });
        break;
    case 45:
        hello = "hello";
        for (var i = 0; i < doThisWhenHelloIsSet.length; i++) {
            doThisWhenHelloIsSet[i](hello);
        }
        doThisWhenHelloIsSet = [];
        break;
}

Note: If you want to only store one next action, then you do not need an array.

share|improve this answer
    
perfect, works as intended, thank you very much! +++ –  Trisztán Thar Jul 18 '13 at 8:54

You could aggregate the case check with your hello variable. Check if it's set with the check for $variable === 13.

var hello;
switch (true) {
    case $variable === 2: 
        // blah
        break;
    case $variable === 3:
        // blah
        break;

    // this will get called when $variable is 13, 
    // and hello is not blank anymore
    case !!hello && $variable === 13:
        // do something magical
        break;

    case $variable === 45:
        // set hello somewhere?
        hello = 'hello';
        break;
}

If what you meant was to have both the case 13 and case 45 logic processed at once, you can always try a fallthrough (though be careful).

var hello;
switch ($variable) {
    case 2 : 
        // blah
        break;
    case 3 :
        // blah
        break;

    // notice I switched these last two up
    case 45 :
        hello = 'hello';
        // notice that there's no break statement
        // so the logic flows into the case 13 right after case 45.

    case 13 :
        if (!!hello) {
            // do something magical with hello
        }
        break;
}
share|improve this answer

Not totally sure I understand but is this what you want?

var hello = null;
switch ($variable) {
case 2:
    //do something irrelevant
    break;
case 3:
    //do something irrelevant
    break;
case 13:
    //do something with variable named "hello". Ex.:
    if ( hello !== null) {
       alert(hello);
    }
    break;
case 45:
    hello = "hello";
    break;

}

share|improve this answer
    
You probably mean null, not NULL? –  Bergi Jul 17 '13 at 23:42
    
@Bergi You are probably right. –  RiggsFolly Jul 17 '13 at 23:46

you CAN simply abuse the for loop (or any loop really) to code a goto in JS:

var x=false, y=5;

above: for(;;){

  switch(y){
   case 3: x=true; break;
   case 5: y=3; continue above;
  }

  break above;
}

alert([x,y]); // shows: true,3

i would prefer to see you use an async pattern, those are nice are popular right now anyway, but maybe this will help if all else fails.

share|improve this answer

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