Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table in my MySQL database named mysite_categories, there are 4 columns but for my purposes I just need two (name, base_url).

I currently have a template '*base_categories.html*' that I use to load the categories manually.

base_categories.html (trimmed down)

{% block content %}
  <div class="section" style="float: right;">
    <h4 class="gradient">Category List</h4>
    <ul>
      <li><a href="/categories/Art" id="nav_font">Art</a></li>
      <li><a href="/categories/Biography" id="nav_font">Biography</a></li>
      <li><a href="/categories/Science" id="nav_font">Science</a></li>
    </ul>
  </div>
{% endblock %}

What I'd like to do is pull the data from the db and use it in a for loop. Something like:

{% block content %}
  <div class="section" style="float: right;">
    <h4 class="gradient">Category List</h4>
    <ul>
      {% for category in mysite_categories %}
        <li><a href="{{ category.base_url }}" id="nav_font">{{ category.name }}</a></li>
      {% endfor %}
    </ul>
  </div>
{% endblock %}

This is probably a newbie question but is it possible to something like this without creating an app?

*EDIT 1*

These are my app files, I'll admit this is probably junk, I have tried so many edits from so many different posts I'm sure I've broke it somewhere :P. I was going to remove it and start fresh but I figure I might as well post it to see where I might have gone wrong?

views.py

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from categories.models import categoryList


def index(request):
    categories = categoryList.objects.all()
    extra_context = {"categories": categories}

    return render_to_response("myapp/index.html", extra_context)

models.py

from django.db import models


class categoryList(models.Model):
    #id = models.IntegerField(unique=True, db_column='ID') # Field name made lowercase.
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255L, unique=True)
    base_url = models.CharField(max_length=255L, unique=True)
    thumb = models.CharField(max_length=1L, unique=True, blank=True)
    class Meta:
        db_table = 'mysite_categories'

index.html

{% if error_message %}<p><strong>{{ error_message }}</strong></p>{% endif %}

<div class="section" style="float: right;">
  <h4 class="gradient">Category List</h4>
  <ul>
    {% for category in categories %}
      <li><a href="" id="nav_font">{{ category.title }}</a></li>
    {% endfor %}
  </ul>
</div>

As mentioned, it's probably junk at this point, if any of you can help me straighten this out it would be appreciated!

*EDIT 2*

base_right_panel.html

{% block content %}
  <div style="float: right;">
    <div id="base_categories" style="margin: 10px; padding-bottom: 10px;">
      {% block base_categories %}
        {% include "base_categories.html" %}
      {% endblock %}
    </div>
  </div>
{% endblock %}

*Edit 3*

base_categories.html

{% block content %}
  <div class="section" style="float: right;">
    <h4 class="gradient">Category List</h4>
    <ul>
      {% if categories %}
        {% for category in categories %}
          <li><a href="" id="nav_font">{{ category.title }}</a></li>
        {% endfor %}
      {% else %}
        <p>no data! {{ categories|length }}</p>
      {% endif %}
    </ul>
  </div>
{% endblock %}

*EDIT 4*

(Application name was changed to CategoryList)

CategoryList/views.py

from django.views.generic import TemplateView
from CategoryList.models import CategorylistCategorylist #<-- Changed to match inspectdb result

class IndexView(TemplateView):
    template_name="categorylist.html" #<-- Changed name from index.html for clarity

    def get_context_data(self, **kwargs):
        context = super(IndexView, self).get_context_data(**kwargs)
        context["categories"] = CategorylistCategorylist.objects.all()
        return context

CategoryList/models.py

from django.db import models

class CategorylistCategorylist(models.Model): #<-- Changed to match inspectdb
    id = models.IntegerField(primary_key=True)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255L, unique=True)
    base_url = models.CharField(max_length=255L, unique=True)
    thumb = models.ImageField(upload_to="dummy", blank=True) #<-- Ignored inspectdb's suggestion for CharField

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

    # Re-added Meta to match inspectdb
    class Meta:
        db_table = 'categorylist_categorylist'

CategoryList/urls.py

from django.conf.urls.defaults import patterns, url, include
from django.contrib import admin
from django.conf import settings
from CategoryList import views

admin.autodiscover()

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^$', views.IndexView.as_view(), name='categorylist'),
)

if settings.DEBUG:
    urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^media/(?P<path>.*)$', 'django.views.static.serve',
        {'document_root': settings.MEDIA_ROOT, 'show_indexes': True}),
    url(r'', include('django.contrib.staticfiles.urls')),
) + urlpatterns

MySite/urls.py

from django.conf.urls import patterns, include, url
from django.contrib import admin
from django.conf import settings
from home import views as home_view
from CategoryList import views as index_view

admin.autodiscover()

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^$', home_view.HomeView.as_view(), name="home"),

    url(r'^categories/$', index_view.IndexView.as_view(), name='categorylist'),#include('CategoryList.urls')),

    url(r'^admin/', include(admin.site.urls)),
    #url(r'^admin/doc/', include('django.contrib.admindocs.urls')),
)

if settings.DEBUG:
    urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^media/(?P<path>.*)$', 'django.views.static.serve',
        {'document_root': settings.MEDIA_ROOT, 'show_indexes': True}),
    url(r'', include('django.contrib.staticfiles.urls')),
) + urlpatterns

So far I can load the url "localhost:8000/categories" and I will see the list of category names appear on the right side of the screen as expected, but there is no template formatting applied. Inside my "*base_right_panel.html*" file I've tried "{% include "categorylist.html %}" to link directly to the application, which displays the correct template formatting, but displays the "{% else %}" response from "{% if categories %}" instead of the categories? I have tried changing the include to point to "categories/", which works in the browser, but it tells me it cannot find the template?

I'm sooo stumped right now..?

share|improve this question
    
If an app is absolutely needed, how would I call the results of the app and use the results in 'base_categories.html'? –  AWainb Jul 17 '13 at 23:40
    
Please see: stackoverflow.com/questions/17794168/… for images of the problem. –  AWainb Jul 22 '13 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could execute custom SQL directly to fetch categories in your view, and loop through the output in your template. This would not require an app.

If you create a model, you will be able to use the Django queryset api, which is very convenient, e.g.

mysite_categories = Category.objects.all()

This does require you to create an app. However, creating an app is really easy, just use the startapp command.

python manage.py startapp myapp

Once you've created your app, you can use the inspectdb command to inspect your database, and create a model for your mysite_categories table.

share|improve this answer
    
I have created an app and used inspectdb to create the model. What I can't figure out is how to embed the app within the the base_categories.html? I am very new to django (and web programming in general), the purpose of this view is to have it as part of my navigation panel on the right side 'base_right_panel.html' and I use {% include base_categories.html" %} inside a block to add the category section to the right panel. Is there a way to use the app inside the "base_right_panel.html"? Can I just set the include path to the app's "index.html" file, or something similar? –  AWainb Jul 17 '13 at 23:50
    
What view are you using to render your template? The view is where you do things like collect the categories and put them into the context that your template will use when rendering. –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 17 '13 at 23:56
    
First, get the categories working in one view by including mysite_categories = MyModel.objects.all() in your template context. Then, if you want to include the categories on every page, you need to explore template context processors or custom template tags. –  Alasdair Jul 17 '13 at 23:57
    
Maybe you could also clarify something for me? I was under the impression that view.py and models.py were files generated when you use startapp, how would one use these files if there is no app? can they be added to projects as well as apps? (yeah, I'm that new lol, and the tutorials out there have been pretty vague so far) –  AWainb Jul 17 '13 at 23:58
    
To create models, you must create an app with a models.py module, and add the app to your INSTALLED_APPS setting. You can create a views.py in your project root if you wish, and import its views in your project's root urls.py. –  Alasdair Jul 18 '13 at 0:02

This answer is not meant to disagree with Alasdair's - it's just to add some more information on working with templates.

The core handler of an HTTP request to a Django application is the view. The view receives the HTTP request, as well as any arguments captured from the URL, and is responsible for returning an HttpResponse instance (or an instance of one of its subclasses) which will be returned to the browser.

The view is not bound to use any particular method to create the HttpResponse. Rendering a template to include information derived from the database and from request information or URL arguments is sufficiently common that there's code to support it, like the render shortcut or its mostly obsolete antecedent render_to_response, but this is by no means required. It's perfectly legitimate to have a view directly construct the HttpResponse:

def index(request):
    return HttpResponse('This is an index page.')

Or, for very simple HTML:

def index(request):
    return HttpResponse('<html><head><title>example</title></head><body>This is an index page.</body></html>')

In practice, I have often created HttpResponse instances directly to return json data or a dynamically created PDF or Excel file.

A simple way to slot information retrieved from the database into your response would be to use Python's built-in string interpolation:

def index(request):
    return HttpResponse('Hello, %s' % request.user.email)

Or you could use the advanced string formatting options:

def index(request):
    user_names = {}
    user_names['first_name'] = request.user.first_name
    user_names['last_name'] = request.user.last_name
    return HttpResponse('Hello, %(first_name)s %(last_name)s' % user_names)

All this is building up to the point that it doesn't matter how you generate the text contents of your HttpResponse. All that matters is that you return one.

The template system is a powerful and extensible tool for generating text content, but that's all it does. If you look at the template docs about rendering a template, you'll see some examples that are almost exactly the same as the the string interpolation above.

render_to_response was a shortcut that would accept a template and a context and return an HttpResponse with the rendered contents of that template and context. Skipping over its context_instance and content_type parameters for the sake of demonstration, these two code blocks are identical in effect:

def index(request):
    t = Template('Hello, {{ first_name }} {{ last_name }}')
    c = Context({'first_name': request.user.first_name, 'last_name': request.user.last_name})
    response_text = t.render(c)
    return HttpResponse(response_text)

Assume a template index.txt exists as defined below, at the top level of an entry in the setting's TEMPLATE_DIRS tuple.

index.txt
Hello, {{ first_name}} {{ last_name}}

Then the view above could be replaced with:

def index(request):
    t = get_template('index.html')
    c = Context({'first_name': request.user.first_name, 'last_name': request.user.last_name})
    response_text = t.render(c)
    return HttpResponse(response_text)

Alternatively, you can skip the explicit creation of the context object and rendering of the template into a string thus:

def index(request):
    return render_to_response('index.html', {'first_name': request.user.first_name, 'last_name': request.user.last_name})

On more recent versions of Django you should generally use the render shortcut rather than render_to_response - the details are a bit too much to go into if you're still struggling with getting context into your templates.

def index(request):
    return render('index.html', {'first_name': request.user.first_name, 'last_name': request.user.last_name})

Of course, part of what makes templates useful is that the rendering engine can perform certain kinds of logic and lookup. I don't actually need to explictly keep looking up first_name and last_name - I can just pass in request as part of my context and look up its attributes in the templates:

index_showing_context.html
Hello, {{ request.user.first_name }} {{ request.user.last_name }}

def index_showing_context(request):
    return render('index_showing_context.html', {'request': request})

Even passing in request isn't strictly necessary in that example, because one of the differences between render and render_to_response that I alluded to above is that request is always part of the context for render. But, again, that's an advanced subject.

So for your particular problem, it really doesn't matter where in your templates you render the data you want, as long as you have provided it to your view's context and are rendering the correct template. The template is in effect just a file name used to find and build a string, into which your context will be interpolated.

The {% include %} template tag is one way to mix template fragments into other templates. If I wanted to, I could set mine up like this:

header.html:
<head>
<title>This is a sample title.</title>
</head>

index.html:
<html>
{% include "header.html" %}
<body><p>This is my template body, {{ request.user.first_name }} {{ request.user.last_name }}.</p></body>
</html>

detail.html:
<html>
{% include "header.html" %}
<body><p>This is a detail page, probably for something selected in the context and given the context key 'object'.</p>
      <p>{{ object }}</p>
</body>
</html>

That works fine, but it's not the only option. From your question, I see that you're using blocks and template inheritance. A common idiom is to define a base template that all or almost all other templates will inherit from:

base.html
<html>
<head>
<title>{% block title %}Default title{% endblock %}</title>
{% block extra_head_elements %}{% endblock %}
</title>
<body>
{% block body_header %}Standard page header here {% endblock %}
{% block body_content %}{% endblock %}
{% block body_footer %}Standard page footer here {% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

index.html
{% extends "base.html" %}
{% block title %}index {% endblock %}
{% block body_content %}<p>This is my template body, {{ request.user.first_name }} {{ request.user.last_name }}.</p>{% endblock %}

detail.html
{% extends "base.html" %}
{% block title %}detail{% endblock %}
{% block body_content %}<p>This is a detail page, probably for something selected in the context and given the context key 'object'.</p>
      <p>{{ object }}</p>
{% endblock %}

So ultimately, I am not quite sure how you should best stitch together your right panel concept because it depends on the way you want your pages to work. If it's going to be present everywhere or almost everywhere, I would recommend putting it into a base template that the rest of your templates will extend. If you want it on exactly one page, just literally include it in that template. If you want it on some but not all pages, a template fragment that you can {% include %} is probably best.

The main thing is to understand how the template engine will compose your {% include %} and {% extends %} tags, and to provide the necessary data to the template's context in your view.

Edit: If I wanted to have a view and template pair that just retrieved the categories, this is a simple way to lay it out using your example model code and rendering. There are other options.

index.html
<html>
<head><title>Simple category listing</title></head>
<body><p>The categories are:</p>
      <ul>
        {% for category in categories %}
          <li><a href="{{ category.base_url }}" id="nav_font">{{ category.name }}</a></li>
        {% endfor %}
      </ul>
</body>
</html>

view:
def index(request):
    categories = categoryList.objects.all()
    extra_context = {"categories": categories}
    return render_to_response("index.html", extra_context)

If I wanted to reuse the category listing on multiple pages, that gets back into the include vs. extends discussion above. Either way, the template will always require your view to pass in categories as a context variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like I have some reading :P Just to clarify, can I assume that user=table name & first_name=column name in "request.user.first_name"? so in my example I would use something like "request.mysite_categorylist.name" to access the data from the name column in my table? –  AWainb Jul 18 '13 at 5:37
    
user is a model instance representing a table - I worked with the django.contrib.auth user model in this example (documented here: docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/contrib/auth). Models generally map to a specific table in the db, but if you let Django create your tables via syncdb it will prepend the app name - so this table would be auth_user. You can override that for preexisting tables with the db_table attribute on the model's Meta class if necessary. Your example view code looks right - match the categories key in your extra_context dict in the template. –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 18 '13 at 6:16
    
And, yes, first_name is a model field. Model fields are a subset of the database columns - if Django creates your tables, they'll line up exactly, but it's fine to not declare a model field for a column on a preexisting table if you don't need it. And, again, there's an setting if you want a different field name from the column name. Also, it's a special case that you get the current user from the request object - in your example you would use something like categories = categoryList.objects.all() to fetch the possible categories. Then as you have, `extra_context={'categories': ...} –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 18 '13 at 6:21
2  
There are a couple of things to check. Is your model class accurately mapped to your table? I would usually check this using python manage.py shell to start an interpreter in the Django environment, then execute categoryList.objects.count(). Is your template getting the right context? That is a little harder to test, but you can (for debugging) just display {{ categories }} and set the variable TEMPLATE_STRING_IF_INVALID in your settings.py to something other than empty string to see if categories is in your context or not. –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 18 '13 at 6:51
1  
You need to add the category queryset to your context in your HomeView. Remember, the view uses the templates to build the response - including a template that you also use in a different view (IndexView) does not cause any interaction with IndexView. –  Peter DeGlopper Jul 22 '13 at 18:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.