Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a vector std::vector <int> density; which stores a set of values imported from a input.csv file.

The values are varying between 0 and 2^16, and ordered on a regular grid of int C columns and int L lines.

Now, I want to use bilinear interpolation to compute a new set of values std::vector <float> D

These new values will be arranged in another regular grid of int x columns and int y lines.

.

My problem:

To perform a bilinear interpolation based on a squared grid of data I have to know for each position (x,y) what are the local 4 surrounding density values for:

D1 (C,L), D2 (C,L), D3 (C,L), D4 (C,L)

In other words, each interpolated point of D with position (Dx,Dy) - Dx and Dy being inferior or equal to 1 - is located within a squared "cell" of the original dataset defined by 4 density values relative to their position (C,L) the original grid.

How can I easily define, for any arbitrary position (Dx,Dy) that is within the range of C and L (not outside the grid!) the 4 surrounding density values D1, D2, D3, D4?

And how can I define, within the (D1, D2, D3, D4) cell, the positions (u,v) defined by the point d (see the code for understanding the point d) within the cell

If you please could help me improve the code... :) Thanks!

//

To make it easier to conceptualize, here's an example with numerical values:

  • input.csv

    200; 300; 400

    100; 100; 100

    0; 100; 200

  • number of columns: C = 3

  • number of lines : L = 3

  • after pushing back these, vector a contains the following:

    200, 300, 400, 100, 100, 100, 0, 100, 200

  • number of columns of the new file: x = 4

  • number of lines of the new file : y = 4

  • the algorithm should do the following:

for the position (Dx, Dy) = (0, 0)

(u, v) = (0, 0)

we are in the 1st cell so

(D1, D2, D3, D4) = (200, 300, 100, 100)

and since (u, v) = (0, 0)

the density is equal to D1 = 200

so b = 200

NOW, we pass to the next xalue of Dx > Dx = x+1 (returns 1)

  • C is equal to 3, x is equal to 4, and Dx * C / x = 1 * 2 / 3 = 0.666666667 or 2/3

  • 2/3 < 1 so we are still in the first cell

for the position (Dx, Dy) = (2/3, 0)

(u, v) = (2/3, 0)

Since u > 0 and v = 0 the density is between D1 and D2

d = u * D2 + (1-u) * D1   (returns 266.666666667)

Lets imagine a file output.csv containing 4 col and 4 lines, with the result, it should contain: (spaces are just here to help reading...)

200;          266.6666667;  333.3333333;  400
133.3333333;  155.5555556;  177.7777778;  200
66.66666667;  66.88888889;  111.1111111;  133,3333333
0;            66.66666667;  133,3333333;  200
  • input 3 x 3 was:

    200; 300; 400

    100; 100; 100

    0; 100; 200

//

code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

//_____________________________________________________________________________

int main() {

/// original grid

int C = 0;                  // amount of columns in the .csv
int L = 0;                  // amount of lines   in the .csv
int a = 0;                  // a variable temporarily stores .csv value
std::vector <int> density;  // stores a dataset from the .csv

//_____________________________________________________________________________

    ifstream ifs ("input.csv");                 // importing the .csv

    cout << "number of columns?" << endl;       // specifying number of columns
    cin  >> C;
    cout << endl;
    cout << "number of lines?" << endl;         // specifying number of lines
    cin  >> L;
    cout << endl;


    char dummy;

        for (int i = 0; i < L; ++i){            // pushing the values of the .csv into the vector
            for (int i = 0; i < C; ++i){
                ifs >> a;
                density.push_back(a);

                    if (i < (C - 1))
                        ifs >> dummy;
            }

//_______________________________________________________________________________

/// output grid

int x = 0;                  // coordinate x
int y = 0;                  // coordiante y
int Dx = 0;                 // horizontal position 
int Dy = 0;                 // vertical position
int b = 0;                  // interpolated density
std::vector <float> D;      // stores the interpolated values


    cout << "number of columns of the new file?" << endl;       // specifying number of columns
    cin  >> x;
    cout << endl;
    cout << "number of lines of the new file?" << endl;         // specifying number of lines
    cin  >> y;
    cout << endl;

}

/// DIAGRAM OF A CELL WITH THE POSITION OF: b (u,v)

//__________________________________________________
//
//      D1 ---u--- D2
//       |    |     |
//       v----b     |
//       |          |
//      D3 ------- D4
//
//__________________________________________________


int D1 = 0;         // densities of the four points of the cell containing (x,y)
int D2 = 0;
int D3 = 0;
int D4 = 0;

float u = 0;        // horizontal and vertical positions of b within the cell
float v = 0;



//_______________________________________________________________________
/// PART MISSING HERE: HOW TO GET D1, D2, D3, D4, u, v ???
//_______________________________________________________________________


        while (x<C, y<L)    {
                                                // formulae for bilinear interpolation
        double DL = D1 - D1 * v + D3 * v;       // Vertical linear interpolation right side
        double DR = D2 - D2 * v + D4 * v;       // Vertical linear interpolation left side
        double D  = DL - DL * u + DR * u;       // Horizontal linear interpolation

        D.push_back (b);

        x++;                // next interpolation

            if (x>C) {

                y = y++;
            }
        }

}
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps you could give a small example with real numbers (say, on a grid of size 3x3) for density, x, y, u, v, etc.? When your code has them all set to 0, it's a little hard to conceptualize. –  user2530166 Jul 18 '13 at 0:02
    
ok, I'll will do that now, give me 5 min –  adrienlucca.wordpress.com Jul 18 '13 at 0:26
    
@RyanMcK I just re-edited the post –  adrienlucca.wordpress.com Jul 18 '13 at 1:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.