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What is the proper way of reading subprocess and the stdout

Here are my files:

traffic.sh
code.py

traffic.sh:

sudo tcpdump -i lo -A | grep Host:

code.py:

proc = subprocess.Popen(['./traffic.sh'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
# Do some network stuff like ping places, send an email, open a few web pages and wait for them to finish loading
# Stop all traffic and make sure its over
data = proc.stdout.read()
proc.kill()

The code above sometimes works and sometimes doesnt.

The times that it fails, its is due to getting stuck on the proc.stdout.read().

I have followed a bunch of examples that recommend to setup a thread and queue for the proc and read the queue as the proc writes. However, this turnout to be intermittent as to how it works.

I feel like im doing something wrong with the kill and the read. because I can guarantee that there is no communication happening on lo when I make that call and therefore, traffic.sh should not be printing out anything at all.

Then why is the read blocking.

Any clean alternative to the thread?

Edit I have also tried this, in the hope that the read would no longer block since the process would is terminated

proc = subprocess.Popen(['./traffic.sh'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
# Do some network stuff like ping places, send an email, open a few web pages and wait for them to finish loading
# Stop all traffic and make sure its over
proc.kill()
data = proc.stdout.read()
share|improve this question
    
The read continues until the input stream is closed. Nothing obviously there closes the output stream from the script (thus, the input stream to the subprocess) while the pipeline in the script is still running. – Charles Duffy Jul 18 '13 at 1:38
    
What's your actual desired behavior? Maybe you want to only read one line, instead of reading all input? If that's the case, have your pipeline end in head -n 1. – Charles Duffy Jul 18 '13 at 1:39
    
@CharlesDuffy, can I force the pipe to close, I also did proc.kill() before the read hoping it would close. but had the same issue – Cripto Jul 18 '13 at 1:41
    
Ahh -- so there's a delay first. Yes, you need to do the kill() before you can do a blocking read. Though the blocking read is a bloody bad idea even so -- it means that tcpdump's output is limited by your buffer size. – Charles Duffy Jul 18 '13 at 1:47
    
@CharlesDuffy. No go. :( Note my edit please. – Cripto Jul 18 '13 at 1:53

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