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I'm trying out Bram Cohen's original BitTorrent v5 here:

http://www.afterdawn.com/software/source_codes/bittorrent_linux.cfm

(from this post: bittorrent source code?)

I'm running it on CentOS 6, Python 2.6, and it works perfectly. Was able to download! But I need to modify the source so I can use it in my private network. I came to understand that when a peer finishes a piece download/upload to another, it disconnects (or even more complex, if it is in the list of active peers with the highest upload rate, it will stay connected).

I want it such that, two peers are always connected (i.e. no choking, always interested, no dropping/disconnecting) for as long as file transfers are ensuing. I haven't fully understood the code yet, though it's written in Python so it may be fairly readable.

Any help:

  • general discussion on understanding peers' behavior in torrent,
  • how and where to modify the code,
  • modification of the code itself (but that's asking too much),
  • what else to look into,
  • etc.

-- will be much appreciated!

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Perhaps consider producing a call graph (pycallgraph.slowchop.com) when running the client to see how the function/method calls are made. From that, you should find the relevant function that decides when a connection is dropped and change that behaviour to suit. –  dilbert Jul 22 '13 at 6:51
    
I'll look into this. Thanks! –  joalT Jul 23 '13 at 9:43
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closed as too broad by Oli Charlesworth, martineau, Zero Piraeus, David Cain, mhlester Mar 7 at 0:14

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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