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i am having a little trouble getting DEoptim to do what i want. i am sure that this is largely due to my naive usage. my understanding of differential optimisation is that it is a technique which aims to avoid getting stuck in local minima of the objective function. obviously the degree to which it is successful depends on just how irregular the objective function is.

this is my objective function:

N <- 10000

obj.func <- function(x) {
    set.seed(x*100000)
    #
    # Generate Monte Carlo estimate of pi
    #
    r <- sqrt(runif(N, -1, 1)**2 + runif(N, -1, 1)**2)
    #
    pi.estimate = sum(r <= 1) / N * 4
    #
    # Objective function
    #
    return((x - pi.estimate)**2)
}

this is a rather extreme example. my real application has an objective function which is not quite as noisy but is multi-dimensional. so i thought that i would first play around with a toy example while i am figuring out how DEoptim works.

the objective function is plotted below as a scatter plot evaluated at intervals of 0.00001. the red is the noise-free objective function (which is symmetric around pi) and the dashed blue line is the location of the actual minimum in the noisy objective function, which is located at x = 3.15719.

objective function

after fiddling around with the options of DEoptim i found that i got reasonable results with

> library(DEoptim)
> set.seed(1)
> DEoptim(obj.func, lower = 2, upper = 4,
+         control = DEoptim.control(trace = 10, strategy = 6, itermax = 10000))
Iteration: 10 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.105490
Iteration: 20 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.130510
Iteration: 30 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.130510
Iteration: 40 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.148317
Iteration: 50 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.148317
Iteration: 60 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.151152
Iteration: 70 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.151152
Iteration: 80 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.151152
Iteration: 90 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.151152
Iteration: 100 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387
Iteration: 110 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387
Iteration: 120 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387
Iteration: 130 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387
Iteration: 140 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387
Iteration: 150 bestvalit: 0.000000 bestmemit:    3.158387

the output has been cut short because the algorithm seems to get stuck at this solution. if i let it run through to the specified number of iterations (10000), then it is still stubbornly sitting at a result of x = 3.158387. the value of the objective function at this point is

> obj.func(3.158387)
[1] 1.69e-10

whereas at the real minimum it is

> obj.func(3.15719)
[1] 1e-10

so the difference is really small and probably not very important at all. but, since the goal here was learning about DEoptim, i would like to understand what is happening.

what i would like to know is (1) why DEoptim is getting stuck at this value and (2) how i can get it to search around more and ultimately find the real minimum?

thanks, andrew.

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2  
You probably don't want to reset the seed inside the function you're optimising. See here for an example where resetting the seed inside a Monte Carlo experiment made things go wrong. –  Hong Ooi Jul 18 '13 at 5:02
    
Also, what value of N are you using? –  Hong Ooi Jul 18 '13 at 5:21
    
i am using N = 10000. original question updated to reflect this. i agree: resetting the seed inside the function is probably not a great idea (it certainly compromises the independence of values returned by the function), but is used here to ensure repeatability. however, i am not really concerned about whether or not the outcome of the MC simulation gives me the right answer for pi. my concern is more to do with why DE is not actually finding the absolute minimum. –  exegetic Jul 19 '13 at 7:30
    
Reproducibility is assured by setting the seed outside the procedure; you're already doing that with your set.seed(1). Try doing it with values other than 1, and see what you get. –  Hong Ooi Jul 19 '13 at 7:39

2 Answers 2

Try to find an option like this: (because I am using implementation in MATLAB)

F_VTR "Value To Reach" (stop when ofunc < F_VTR)

This option can be set to a very small value, like:

F_VTR = 1e-16;

then the algorithm will find the global minimum or you will find out that it has actually stuck at the local mimima.

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Be wary about the choice of objective function.

Generally, I don't know enough about your problem, but the following steps can help in optimisation.

  • choice of objective function type alters your optimised obj.fun value. Investigate your residuals (errors) and check if your statistical model assumption is valid.
  • look at DEoptim.control. Here you can set convergence criteria, and dithering/stepsizes.
  • check if you can transform parameters in the optimisation (re-transforming them in your obj.fun
  • don't use set.seed in obj.functions. It can only produce comparable erroneous(!) results.
  • Use good intial guesses for a starting population in DEoptim() (e.g. look at lhs package for multidimensional optimisation).
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