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I am exploring using boost::asio along with C++11 features. In particular, I am focusing on an example called "async_tcp_echo_server.cpp", located here (code is also shown at the end of my question):

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_54_0/doc/html/boost_asio/example/cpp11/echo/async_tcp_echo_server.cpp

My question involves the tcp::socket member socket_ of the server class. In the do_accept() method of the server class, socket_ is passed to async_accept(). (According to the asio documentation, async_accept() requires, as its first parameter, the socket to accept the connection into.) So far, so good.

The next parameter, the callback for the asynchronous accept operation, is a lambda function. The body of the lambda constructs a new session object, whose constructor also needs the same socket. Interestingly, socket objects cannot be copied; so in the example, the socket_ object, which is a member of the server object, is passed using std::move().

I understand that the "one and only" socket_ object (which is a "permanent" member of the server object) is "moved" into the session object. Fine -- socket object is not copied, but moved -- everybody's happy.

But what happens on the next call to async_accept()? Is the same socket_ (member of server), that was previously moved, passed in again? When we "move" a member, what is left behind? Is there a magical fountain of unlimited socket objects?

Or is something really less-than-obvious happening here? When the socket is moved into the session, is the contents of the "left behind/moved from" object (socket_ member of server) swapped with the contents of the "new" session object's own "not-yet-constructed" socket_ member? Am I even making sense?

Summary

Code is below. Program flow is fairly simple. main() constructs a single server object. The server makes repeated calls to async_accept(). Each async_accept() callback creates a new session object, each constructed with a (fresh?) socket. Where do all the "fresh" socket objects come from, if they are simply (repeatedly) "moved" from the same socket_ member in the (single) server?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <utility>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>

using boost::asio::ip::tcp;

class session
: public std::enable_shared_from_this<session>
{
public:
    session( tcp::socket socket )
    : socket_( std::move( socket ) )
    {}

    void start() {
        do_read();
    }

private:
    void do_read() {
        auto self( shared_from_this() );
        socket_.async_read_some(
            boost::asio::buffer( data_, max_length ),
            [this, self]( boost::system::error_code ec, std::size_t length )
            {
                if( !ec ) {
                    do_write( length );
                }
            }
        );
    }

    void do_write( std::size_t length ) {
        auto self( shared_from_this() );
        boost::asio::async_write(
            socket_,
            boost::asio::buffer( data_, length ),
            [this, self]( boost::system::error_code ec, std::size_t /*length*/ )
            {
                if( !ec ) {
                    do_read();
                }
            }
        );
    }

    tcp::socket socket_;
    enum { max_length = 1024 };
    char data_[max_length];
};


class server {
public:
    server( boost::asio::io_service& io_service, short port )
    : acceptor_( io_service, tcp::endpoint( tcp::v4(), port ) )
    , socket_( io_service )
    {
        do_accept();
    }

private:
    void do_accept() {
        acceptor_.async_accept(
            socket_,
            [this]( boost::system::error_code ec )
            {
               if( !ec ) {
                   std::make_shared<session>( std::move( socket_ ) )->start();  // is this a *swap* of socket_ ???
               }

               do_accept();
            }
        );
    }

    tcp::acceptor acceptor_;
    tcp::socket socket_;
};


int main( int argc, char* argv[] ) {
    try {
        if( argc != 2 ) {
            std::cerr << "Usage: async_tcp_echo_server <port>\n";
            return 1;
        }

        boost::asio::io_service io_service;

        server s( io_service, std::atoi( argv[1] ) );

        io_service.run();

    } catch( std::exception& e ) {
        std::cerr << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
} 
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As documented in tcp::socket reference:

Following the move, the moved-from object is in the same state as if constructed using the basic_stream_socket(io_service&) constructor.

The above means that you can move the original socket object from server to session as many times as you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing this. –  PSIAlt Jul 18 '13 at 12:24
    
ARGGGH! I read the documentation... how did I miss this? Thanks!!! –  Kevin H. Patterson Jul 18 '13 at 12:26
2  
One more thought... is this not rather obfuscated code? Does this not expose hidden functionality that should be more explicit? –  Kevin H. Patterson Jul 18 '13 at 12:28
    
@Kevin H. Patterson Where is a hidden functionality here? The code looks to me rather intuitive. The alternative would be (like in non c++11 examples) to expose session::socket_, which is kindof implementation detail... –  Igor R. Jul 18 '13 at 12:29
    
@Igor R. Well, my understanding is, using move semantics, the (source) rvalue should be left in a state ready for destruction. The less-than-obvious thing here (to me) is that the rvalue would be re-initialized as if it were a freshly constructed object after we've moved it. Certainly the code is clean, but knowing this outcome is (imho) an implementation detail of the session constructor, is it not? Otherwise, I don't think we should normally attempt to use (or re-use) an rvalue after it has been moved somewhere else, right? –  Kevin H. Patterson Jul 19 '13 at 0:24

Move semantics can be thought of as passing ownership of resources. Resource Acquisition Is Instantiation (RIIA) is the concept of assigning ownership of resources at the time of object construction and the releasing of those resources at destruction. Move semantics allow for the transfer of ownership of resources at other times besides construction and destruction.

In this case, the object (server::socket_) is the recipient of a transfer of ownership of the OS socket resource from server::acceptor_. That transfer occurs at some point after async_accept() returns, when a client connects. The newly connected socket resources are moved into socket_, and the callback lambda function is called. During the lambda, the socket resources are moved into session::socket_. Server::socket_ only owned the resource for a fraction of a microsecond.

Move semantics allow RIAA classes to exist in the twilight state of not owning any resources. Think of a unique_ptr after a call to release. (It refers to no memory.) The server::socket_ after the move out still has space to hold a resource, but for the moment it owns nothing.

The last thing the lambda function does is call do_accept, which calls async_accept() again. A reference to socket_ is passed in. When another client connects at some point in the future, async_accept() will transfer ownership of a newly connected OS socket there.

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