Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a very simple TCP client as follows. The problem is that the connect() call always returns 0 even when there is no server on the other side.

int TcpSend(struct sockaddr_in* ipv4_client, const void* buffer, size_t size) {

    int sd_client = 0;
    int status = -1;

    // Grab an ipv4 TCP socket.
    sd_client = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if (sd_client == -1) {
        return -1;
    }

    // Make the socket non-blocking so that connect may fail immediately
    status = fcntl(sd_client, F_SETFL, O_NONBLOCK);
    if (status < 0) {
        close(sd_client);
        return -1;
    }

    // Bind and connect
    status = connect(sd_client, (struct sockaddr*)ipv4_client, sizeof(*ipv4_client));
    if (status == -1) {
        close(sd_client);
        return -1;
    }

    printf("Status: %d %s\n", status, strerror(errno)); //// ??? : I always get status = 0 here

    // Send a message to the server PORT on machine HOST.
    // Ignore the fact that send might not have sent the complete data
    status = send(sd_client, buffer, size, 0);  //// Consequently I get a SIGPIPE here
    if (status == -1) {
        close(sd_client);
        return -1;
    }

    close(sd_client);

    return 0;
}

I understand that connect() will pass if just binding succeeds and the connection doesn't happen. However it shouldn't happen when the socket is made O_NONBLOCK. The code always passes at connect() and I get a SIGPIPE error inside send().

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

After you connect in non-blocking mode you need to call select() with the socket FD in the writable set, i.e. wait until it becomes writable, then either (1) check for errors on the socket via getsockopt(), or (2) call connect() again and check the error. Only after all that is it valid to start calling send() or recv().

share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem was ipv4_client->sin_family was somehow 0.

Doing the following fixes the problem.

ipv4_client->sin_family = AF_INET;
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't absolve you from having to do some extra processing or error checking before you start to use the socket if you connect in non-blocking mode. The only practical use of doing that is to lower the default connect timeout. If that isn't your purpose, do the connect in blocking mode and then switch. –  EJP Jul 18 '13 at 8:49
    
@EJP I completely agree that I need more validation. However I was stumped as to why connect() was not returning an error. The question was more on those lines - Sorry if it caused any confusion. –  tinkerbeast Jul 22 '13 at 12:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.