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I have three divs with an complete length of 150% but i dont get them to float in one line: Here is my html:

<div class="clearfix">
<div class="left" id="w1">TEST</div>
<div class="left" id="w2">TEST</div>
<div class="left" id="w3">TEST</div>
</div>

And my css:

html,body { height:100%;width:auto;}

.left {
float: left;

}
  #w1 {width:20%;
 background-color:#009;
  }
#w2{width:100%;
  background-color:#9F3;
 }
#w3{ width:30%;
background-color:#30C;}

Here is the full code on fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/sZwXN/1/ Besides his it would be nice if each panel has an height o 100%!

share|improve this question
    
no, i want the full length greater than 100% – Em Sta Jul 18 '13 at 7:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want 3 div in a row then you will use float:left with all div, but you can not take 150% width in a total of div width. You can take 100% maximum. So, Adjust your width of all div and take total 100%.

share|improve this answer

You can replace float: left by display: table-cell, and putting the three divs into an other one with display: table and width: 150%, rather than trying to trick with float.

Thus, by updating your code like this, you get what you are looking for :

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="left" id="w1">TEST</div>
  <div class="left" id="w2">TEST</div>
  <div class="left" id="w3">TEST</div>
</div>

And the CSS :

.wrapper
{
  display: table;
  width: 150%;
}

.left {
  display: table-cell;
}

And changing your #iw width to respectively 14%, 66%and 20% to keep the ratio you are looking for.

Have a look : http://jsfiddle.net/sZwXN/7/

share|improve this answer

total width should not exceed 100%. in your case 150% so make ratio same with 100%. like 20% of 150% = 12% approx and so on...

html,body { height:100%;width:auto;}

.left {
float: left;

}
#w1 {width:12%;
background-color:#009;
}
#w2{width:70%;
background-color:#9F3;
}
#w3{ width:18%;
background-color:#30C;}

http://jsfiddle.net/sZwXN/4/

share|improve this answer
    
no, i want the full length greater than 100% – Em Sta Jul 18 '13 at 7:03
2  
then you can set parent width:150% but keep these div's total not more than 100%, keep them same ratio – Brij Jul 18 '13 at 7:09

The 3 divs are greater than the width of their parent. You need to adjust them so their widths total is less than or equal to 100%.

share|improve this answer
    
can you give my an working example please? – Em Sta Jul 18 '13 at 7:06
To have in one line reduce the width of w2

#w2{width:50%;
  background-color:#9F3;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
no, i want the full length greater than 100% – Em Sta Jul 18 '13 at 7:02

Try to this css and html

HTML

<div class="left" id="w1">TEST</div>

<div class="right" id="w3">TEST</div>

<div id="w2">TEST</div>

Css

html,body { height:100%;width:auto;}

    .left {
    float: left;

    }
    .right{float:right;}
    #w1 {width:20%;
    background-color:#009;
    }
    #w2{
    background-color:#9F3;
    }
    #w3{ width:30%;
    background-color:#30C;}

Demo

share|improve this answer

floated elements break lines when there's no space for them in the width since your second div is 100%, there will never be space for him with other elements that have width in the same horizontal

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I agree you need to reduce the width or have it in separate lines... – Sheetal Jul 18 '13 at 8:01

The problem is in the semantic, not in the code.

Percentage values always refer to the outer, "father" element with an width defined, or to the viewport, or to the HTML.

If you say a div has width: 100%; , it means it would be as large as the containing element.

It doesn't matter if you say the html/body are 10000px, or 200% wide: the div will have the same width, because, guess what... it is 100% wide.

The question is really mis-asked ... Try reformulating by specifying what you are really trying to achieve.

Otherwise, you would need Chuck Norris. He counted to infinity. Twice. I guess he can count to 150%.

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