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I'm trying to perform face tracking for a simple game I'm trying to make. I'm doing it with Processing.

I used OpenCV to do simple face detection using Haar Cascades. But, it has problems with tracking the face smoothly over time. Also, it doesn't detect a tilted face.

With some Google-ing, I figured out that I have to implement a Kalman Filter to smoothen the face tracking. But, this is my first time I'm hearing about Kalman Filter and I'm having a hard time implementing it.

I'm using this library for OpenCV in Processing: https://github.com/atduskgreg/opencv-processing

If someone could tell me how to implement Kalman Filter with Processing or Java (because this library is based on the Java API), it would be really helpful.

This is the code I'm using for Face Detection. It's one of the example sketches from the library:

import gab.opencv.*;
import processing.video.*;
import java.awt.*;

Capture video;
OpenCV opencv;

void setup() {
  size(640, 480);
  video = new Capture(this, 640/2, 480/2);
  opencv = new OpenCV(this, 640/2, 480/2);
  opencv.loadCascade(OpenCV.CASCADE_FRONTALFACE);  

  video.start();
}

void draw() {
  background(255);
  scale(2);
  opencv.loadImage(video);

  image(video, 0, 0 );

  noFill();
  stroke(0, 255, 0);
  strokeWeight(3);
  Rectangle[] faces = opencv.detect();  
  println(faces.length);

  for (int i = 0; i < faces.length; i++) {
    println(faces[i].x + "," + faces[i].y);
    rect(faces[i].x, faces[i].y, faces[i].width, faces[i].height);
  }
}

void captureEvent(Capture c) {
  c.read();
}
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@William, Yes I came across this when I was searching. But I wasn't able to port the code to Processing. –  Shrihari Jul 18 '13 at 8:27

1 Answer 1

I haven't managed to port the Kalman filter c++ sample William linked to as not all the functions from the c++ api are present in the OpenCV java wrapper, so this is as far as I've got:

import gab.opencv.*;
import processing.video.*;
import java.awt.*;

import org.opencv.core.*;
import org.opencv.video.*;

int w = 640;
int h = 480;
int hw = w/2;
int hh = h/2;

Capture video;
OpenCV opencv;

/*
Mat img(500, 500, CV_8UC3);
KalmanFilter KF(4, 2, 0);
Mat_<float> state(4, 1); // (x, y, Vx, Vy) 
Mat processNoise(4, 1, CV_32F);
Mat_<float> measurement(2,1); measurement.setTo(Scalar(0));
*/
Mat img;
KalmanFilter KF;
Mat processNoise;
MatOfFloat state,measurement;

void setup() {
  size(w, h);
  video = new Capture(this, hw, hh);
  opencv = new OpenCV(this, hw, hh);
  opencv.loadCascade(OpenCV.CASCADE_FRONTALFACE);
  video.start();

  img = new Mat(w,h,CvType.CV_8UC3);
  KF = new KalmanFilter(4,2,0,CvType.CV_32F);
  state = new MatOfFloat(4,1);
}

void draw() {
  background(255);
  scale(2);
  opencv.loadImage(video);

  image(video, 0, 0 );

  noFill();
  stroke(0, 255, 0);
  strokeWeight(3);
  Rectangle[] faces = opencv.detect();  
  if(faces.length > 0)
     rect(faces[0].x,faces[0].y,faces[0].width,faces[0].height);
}

void captureEvent(Capture c) {
  c.read();
}

As you notice I didn't get very far as properties like statePre or transitionMatrix aren't visible.

Although not the same, maybe a bit of averaging might help:

import gab.opencv.*;
import processing.video.*;
import java.awt.*;

int w = 640;
int h = 480;
int hw = w/2;
int hh = h/2;

Capture video;
OpenCV opencv;

int historySize = 10;
Rectangle[] history;

void setup() {
  size(w, h);
  video = new Capture(this, hw, hh);
  opencv = new OpenCV(this, hw, hh);
  opencv.loadCascade(OpenCV.CASCADE_FRONTALFACE);
  video.start();
  setupHistory();
}
void setupHistory(){
  history = new Rectangle[historySize];
  for(int i = 0 ; i  < historySize ; i++) history[i] = new Rectangle();
}
void keyPressed(){
  if(key == 'h' && historySize > 1) {
    noLoop();
    historySize--;
    setupHistory();
    loop();
  }
  if(key == 'H') {
    noLoop();
    historySize++;
    setupHistory();
    loop();
  }
  println(historySize);  
}

void draw() {
  background(255);
  scale(2);
  opencv.loadImage(video);

  image(video, 0, 0 );

  noFill();
  stroke(0, 255, 0);
  strokeWeight(3);
  Rectangle[] faces = opencv.detect();  
  if(faces.length > 0){
     Rectangle f = mousePressed ? average(faces[0]) : faces[0];
     rect(f.x,f.y,f.width,f.height);
  }
}

void captureEvent(Capture c) {
  c.read();
}
Rectangle average(Rectangle newFace){
  Rectangle avg = new Rectangle();
  for(int i = historySize - 1; i > 0; i--){
    history[i] = history[i-1];
    avg.x += history[i].x;
    avg.y += history[i].y;
    avg.width += history[i].width;
    avg.height += history[i].height;
  }
  history[0] = newFace;
  avg.x += history[0].x;
  avg.y += history[0].y;
  avg.width += history[0].width;
  avg.height += history[0].height;
  avg.x /= historySize;
  avg.y /= historySize;
  avg.width /= historySize;
  avg.height /= historySize;
  return avg;
}

Hold the mouse pressed to see the smooth result. Use the H key to increase and h to decrease history size.

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