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I came across the following line in a JS function (it was an RGB to HSB color converter, if you must know)

hsb.s = max != 0 ? 255 * delta / max : 0;

I'm wondering if someone can explain what the "?" and the ":" mean in this context.

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It's the ternary operator: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_operation. –  jaxvy Nov 20 '09 at 16:56
22  
This is one of those questions that is really hard to find the answer to using a search engine. –  Greg Nov 20 '09 at 17:13
13  
It is; I didn't know about the term "ternary operator", so I spent about 10 minutes searching for things like "questionmark operator javascript" and got nowhere. Hopefully, the next person to think this doesn't have to feel my pain. –  Inaimathi Nov 20 '09 at 17:28
1  
possible duplicate of javascript if alternative –  Phil Ross Jul 23 '10 at 22:05
7  
Three years later, you can use the same search term, and end up here! –  hexacyanide Mar 9 '13 at 22:30
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5 Answers 5

up vote 116 down vote accepted

It is called the Ternary Operator.

It has the form of: condition ? value-if-true : value-if-false
Think of the ? as "then" and : as "else".

Your code is equivalent to

if (max != 0)
  hsb.s = 255 * delta / max;
else
  hsb.s = 0;
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8  
"?" isn't the ternary operator; "? :" is the ternary operator. Talking about "?" as the ternary operator is like talking about Abbott without Costello, Laurel without Hardy, Cheech without Chong.... –  Jason S Nov 20 '09 at 17:11
5  
Ok, ok... now I'm using an ambiguous pronoun, happy? :) –  Greg Nov 20 '09 at 17:16
3  
sure. one good ternary operator deserves another.... –  Jason S Nov 20 '09 at 17:45
4  
To be pedantic, it's a ternary operator, which happens to be the only one in most programming languages. Any operator that works on 3 parts is a ternary operator, just like addition is a binary operator that operates on the preceding and following expressions (e.g. 1+2 the plus operates on 1 and 2), or negation is a unary operator (e.g. -x where the value of x is negated). –  Davy8 Aug 15 '11 at 18:56
2  
@Davy8: And this one can be called the conditional-operator to be specific. –  Mechanical snail Aug 14 '12 at 1:02
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Properly parenthesized for clarity, it is

hsb.s = (max != 0) ? (255 * delta / max) : 0;

meaning return either

  • 255*delta/max if max != 0
  • 0 if max == 0
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hsb.s = max != 0 ? 255 * delta / max : 0;

? is a ternary operator, it works like an if in conjunction with the :

!= means not equals

So, the long form of this line would be

if (max != 0) { //if max is not zero
  hsb.s = 255 * delta / max;
} else {
  hsb.s = 0;
}
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This is probably a bit clearer when written with brackets as follows:

hsb.s = (max != 0) ? (255 * delta / max) : 0;

What it does is evaluate the part in the first brackets. If the result is true then the part after the ? and before the : is returned. If it is false, then what follows the : is returned.

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? : isn't this the ternary operator?

var x= expression ? true:false

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That's one example of its use, but there's actually a shorter version of your statement, for those cases where you just want TRUE / FALSE: If 'expression' was just some variable with a number or string in it, "var x = !!expression" will make it into a boolean result. –  Scott Lahteine Jan 4 '12 at 23:15
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