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This expression uses implicit conversion:

SELECT 9.999 * '9.999'

and evaluates 99.980001.

If I log the type information using this:

SELECT
    SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.999 * '9.999', 'BaseType'),
    SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.999 * '9.999', 'Precision'),
    SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.999 * '9.999', 'Scale'),
    SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.999 * '9.999', 'MaxLength')

I get:

  • BaseType numeric
  • Precision 9
  • Scale 6
  • MaxLength 5

I believe I understand all the results except the precision. If number of the digits left to the decimal point is 2 and right is 6, this totals 8.

Why does SQL Server calculate 9 here?

P.S. I use SQL Server 2008 R2

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

From Precision, Scale, and Length (Transact-SQL)

Looking at the section

Operation:
e1 * e2

you will find

Result precision
p1 + p2 + 1

So in your case 4+4+1 => 9

Further to that, you will notice that

SELECT  SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(99.999 * '9.999', 'Precision'), --11 => p1+p1+1
        SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(99.999 * '99.999', 'Precision'), --11 => p1+p1+1
        SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(99.999 * 9.999, 'Precision'), --10 => p1+p2+1
        SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(99.999 * 99.999, 'Precision') -- 11 => p1+p2+1

whereas

SELECT  SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.999 * '9.999', 'Precision') --9 => p1+p1+1

and

SELECT  SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(9.99 * '9.999', 'Precision')

cuases

Arithmetic overflow error converting varchar to data type numeric.
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have RTFM myself, thanks! Now I have to find out why does this precision increment happen at all. – OzrenTkalcecKrznaric Jul 18 '13 at 10:45

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