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I would like to know how to rearrange the source data (table) in order to output the desired table using R or SQL, which are displayed below.

Since looping is very slow in R, and my dataset is quite large... it's not preferred to have too much looping in the script. The efficiency is important. Thanks all of your help!

Source data table:

Date    | Country | ID | Fruit  | Favorite | Money
20120101  US        1    Apple     Book      100
20120101  US        2    Orange    Knife     150
20120101  US        3    Banana    Watch     80
20120101  US        4    Melon     Water     90
20120102  US        1    Apple     Phone     120
20120102  US        2    Apple     Knife     130
20120102  US        3    Banana    Watch     100           
.....     ......    ..   .....     ......    ......

Output table:

Date    | Country | Field   | ID 1 | ID 2  | ID 3  | ID 4
20120101  US        Fruit     Apple  Orange  Banana  Melon
20120101  US        Favorite  Book   Knife   Watch   Water
20120101  US        Money     100    150     80      90
20120102  US        Fruit     Apple  Apple   Banana  N.A.
....      ....      ....      ....   ....    ....    ....
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried so far? Please show us your code. Look at this excellent post for tips on how to make your code reproducible. –  SlowLearner Jul 18 '13 at 9:14
    
The code I tried is put here. I used loops twice to produce it. gist.github.com/anonymous/bfa8b229622555ba8a77 –  C.T. Jul 18 '13 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is an approach in R, using your sample data:

x <- cbind(mydf[, c("Date", "Country", "ID")], 
           stack(mydf[, c("Fruit", "Favorite", "Money")]))
reshape(x, direction = "wide", 
        idvar = c("Date", "Country", "ind"), 
        timevar="ID")
#        Date Country      ind values.1 values.2 values.3 values.4
# 1  20120101      US    Fruit    Apple   Orange   Banana    Melon
# 5  20120102      US    Fruit    Apple    Apple   Banana     <NA>
# 8  20120101      US Favorite     Book    Knife    Watch    Water
# 12 20120102      US Favorite    Phone    Knife    Watch     <NA>
# 15 20120101      US    Money      100      150       80       90
# 19 20120102      US    Money      120      130      100     <NA>

In this answer, mydf is defined as:

mydf <- structure(
  list(Date = c(20120101L, 20120101L, 20120101L, 
                20120101L, 20120102L, 20120102L, 20120102L), 
       Country = c("US", "US", "US", "US", "US", "US", "US"), 
       ID = c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 1L, 2L, 3L),
       Fruit = c("Apple", "Orange", "Banana", "Melon", 
                 "Apple", "Apple", "Banana"), 
       Favorite = c("Book", "Knife", "Watch", "Water", 
                    "Phone", "Knife", "Watch"), 
       Money = c(100L, 150L, 80L, 90L, 120L, 130L, 100L)), 
  .Names = c("Date", "Country", "ID", 
             "Fruit", "Favorite", "Money"), 
  class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -7L))
share|improve this answer
    
It looks the same as the desired one, thanks! Does it also work if the country field has multiple values, say "US","KR","HK"etc? –  C.T. Jul 18 '13 at 9:58
    
@C.T., it should. Why don't you try it on a small sample of data first. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 18 '13 at 10:00
    
Yes it works for multiple values of Country. For huge data frame, it takes time to finish the process. –  C.T. Jul 18 '13 at 10:35
    
@C.T. just FYI, I find the target structure that you are trying to achieve hard to work with. A long format is generally much more user friendly. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 18 '13 at 11:07
    
Would you like to elaborate more on "long format" please? I agree that this structure is hard to achieve even using concise scripts. –  C.T. Jul 19 '13 at 1:30

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