Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is related to this question (Can I access repeated column names in `j` in a data.table join?), that was asked because I assumed that the opposite to this was true.

data.table with just 2 columns:

Suppose you wish to join two data.tables and then perform a simple operation on two joined columns, this can be done either in one or two calls to .[:

N = 1000000
DT1 = data.table(name = 1:N, value = rnorm(N))
DT2 = data.table(name = 1:N, value1 = rnorm(N))
setkey(DT1, name)

system.time({x = DT1[DT2, value1 - value]})     # One Step

system.time({x = DT1[DT2][, value1 - value]})   # Two Step

It turns out that making two calls - doing the join first, and then doing the subtraction - is noticeably quicker than all in one go.

> system.time({x = DT1[DT2, value1 - value]})
   user  system elapsed 
   0.67    0.00    0.67 
> system.time({x = DT1[DT2][, value1 - value]})
   user  system elapsed 
   0.14    0.01    0.16 

Why is this?

data.table with many columns:

If you put a LOT of columns in to the data.table then you do eventually find that the one step approach is quicker - presumably because data.table only uses the columns you reference in j.

N = 1000000
DT1 = data.table(name = 1:N, value = rnorm(N))[, (letters) := pi][, (LETTERS) := pi][, (month.abb) := pi]
DT2 = data.table(name = 1:N, value1 = rnorm(N))[, (letters) := pi][, (LETTERS) := pi][, (month.abb) := pi]
setkey(DT1, name)
system.time({x = DT1[DT2, value1 - value]})
system.time({x = DT1[DT2][, value1 - value]})

> system.time({x = DT1[DT2, value1 - value]})
   user  system elapsed 
   0.89    0.02    0.90 
> system.time({x = DT1[DT2][, value1 - value]})
   user  system elapsed 
   1.64    0.16    1.81 
share|improve this question
1  
I changed the title to something more direct. Hope it's alright. –  Arun Jul 18 '13 at 9:30
2  
I just want to confirm that you realize (not obvious from OP) that there is a hidden by in the first case and the two expressions give very different results in general –  eddi Jul 18 '13 at 12:59
    
the two *types of expressions –  eddi Jul 18 '13 at 13:13
    
@eddi I don't think I did realise - care to expand on that? –  Corone Jul 18 '13 at 13:20
    
See this post and the follow up mailing list discussion. Expectation is that this behavior will become explicit in the future making the difference obvious. –  eddi Jul 18 '13 at 14:33
show 1 more comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think this is due to the repeated subsetting DT1[DT2, value1-value] makes for every name in DT2. That is, you've to perform a j operation for each i here, as opposed to just one j operation after the join. This becomes quite costly with 1e6 unique entries. That is, [.data.table becomes significant and noticeable.

DT1[DT2][, value1-value] # similar to rowSums
DT1[DT2, value1-value]

In the first case, DT1[DT2], you perform the join first, and it is really fast. Of course, with more columns, as you show, you'll see a difference. But the point is performing the join once. But in the second case, you're grouping DT1 by DT2's name and for every one of them you're computing the difference. That is, you're subsetting DT1 for each value of DT2 - one 'j' operation per subset! You can see this better by just running this:

Rprof()
t1 <- DT1[DT2, value1-value]
Rprof(NULL)
summaryRprof()

# $by.self
#                self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
# "[.data.table"      0.96    97.96       0.98    100.00
# "-"                 0.02     2.04       0.02      2.04

Rprof()
t2 <- DT1[DT2][, value1-value]
Rprof(NULL)
summaryRprof()

# $by.self
#                self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
# "[.data.table"      0.22    84.62       0.26    100.00
# "-"                 0.02     7.69       0.02      7.69
# "is.unsorted"       0.02     7.69       0.02      7.69

This overhead in repeated subsetting seems to be overcome when you've too many columns and the join on many columns overtakes as the time-consuming operation. You can probably check this out yourself by profiling the other code.

share|improve this answer
    
brilliant question + answer –  statquant Jul 18 '13 at 10:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.