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As title says, i have this code :

typedef struct Book{
    int id;
    char title[256];
    char summary[2048];
    int numberOfAuthors;
    struct Author *authors;
};


typedef struct Author{
    char firstName[56];
    char lastName[56];
};


typedef struct Books{
    struct Book *arr;
    int numberOfBooks;
};

I get these errors from gcc :

bookstore.c:8:2: error: unknown type name ‘Author’
bookstore.c:9:1: warning: useless storage class specifier in empty declaration [enabled by default]
bookstore.c:15:1: warning: useless storage class specifier in empty declaration [enabled by default]
bookstore.c:21:2: error: unknown type name ‘Book’
bookstore.c:23:1: warning: useless storage class specifier in empty declaration [enabled by default]

If i change the typedefs like this :

typedef struct{
    char firstName[56];
    char lastName[56];
} Author;

Then no warnings and no errors occur. Having searched through http://www.amazon.com/C-Programming-Language-2nd-Edition/dp/0131103628 and a couple of hours googling i can't figure why the first implementation won't work.

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5  
move the Author before Book. Also note that your typedefs are redundant –  icepack Jul 18 '13 at 9:59
    
How is it possible that just change in Author structure is removing error:unknown type name ‘Book’ also? Please have a look here which clearly mention difference between typdef a structure and just defining a structure. –  Dayal rai Jul 18 '13 at 10:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are several things going on here. First, as others have said, the compiler's complaint about unknown type may be because you need to define the types before using them. More important though is to understand the syntax of 3 things: (1) struct definition, (2) struct declaration, and (3) typedef.

When Defining a struct, the struct can be named, or unnamed (if unnamed, then it must be used immediately (will explain what this means further below)).

struct Name {
   ...
};

This defines a type called "struct Name" which then can be used to Declare a struct variable:

struct Name myNameStruct;

This declares a variable called myNameStruct which is a struct of type struct Name.

You can also Define a struct, and declare a struct variable at the same time:

struct Name {
   ...
} myNameStruct;

As before, this declares a variable called myNameStruct which is a struct of type struct Name ... But it does it at the same time it declares the type struct Name.
The type can be used again to declare another variable:

struct Name myOtherNameStruct;

Now typedef is just a way to alias a type with a specific name:

typedef OldTypeName NewTypeName;

Given the above typedef, any time you use NewTypeName it is the same as using OldTypeName. In the C programming language this is particularly useful with structs, because it gives you the ability to leave off the word "struct" when declaring variables of that type and to treat the struct's name simply as a type on its own (as we do in C++). Here is an example that first Defines the struct, and then typedefs the struct:

struct Name {
   ...
};

typedef struct Name Name_t;

In the above OldTypeName is struct Name and NewTypeName is Name_t. So now, to declare a variable of type struct Name, instead of writing:

struct Name myNameStruct;

I can simple write:

Name_t myNameStruct;

NOTE ALSO, the typedef CAN BE COMBINED with the struct definition, and this is what you are doing in your code:

typedef struct {
   ...
} Name_t;

This can also be done while naming the struct, but this is superfluous:

typedef struct Name {
   ...
} Name_t;

NOTE WELL: In the syntax above, since you have started with "typedef" then the whole statement is a typedef statement, in which the OldTypeName happens to be a struct definition. Therefore the compiler interprets the name coming after the right curly brace } as the NewTypeName ... it is NOT the variable name (as it would be in the syntax without typedef, in which case you would be defining the struct and declaring a struct variable at the same time).

Furthermore, if you state typedef, but leave off the Name_t at then end, then you have effectively created an INCOMPLETE typedef statement, because the compiler considers everything within "struct Name { ... }" as OldTypeName, and you are not providing a NewTypeName for the typedef. This is why the compiler is not happy with the code as you have written it (although the compiler's messages are rather cryptic because it's not quite sure what you did wrong).

Now, as I noted above, if you do not name the struct type at the time you define it, then you must use it immediately either to declare a variable:

struct {
   ...
} myNameStruct;  // declares myNameStruct as a variable with this struct
                 // definition, but the definition cannot be re-used.

Or you can use an unnamed struct type in a typedef:

typedef struct {
   ...
} Name_t;

This final syntax is what you actually did when you wrote:

typedef struct{
   char firstName[56];
   char lastName[56];
} Author;

And the compiler was happy. HTH.

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The syntax is of typedef is as follow:

typedef old_type new_type

In your first try, you defined the struct Book type and not Book. In other word, your data type is called struct Book and not Book.

In the second form, you used the right syntax of typedef, so the compiler recognizes the type called Book.

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You just need to define Author before defining Book.

You use Author in Book so it needs to be defined before.

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Thanks for the quick responses. There is no error defining Book before Author, checked it in Kernighan and Ritchie's book. –  Alek Sobczyk Jul 18 '13 at 10:19
    
I was wrong, apparently it does remove the errors if i change positions. I have to study a bit more. (Sorry for double comment, first timer in stackoverflow :P) –  Alek Sobczyk Jul 18 '13 at 10:28

I think is going to help you understand. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cprogramming/c_typedef.htm

bookstore.c:8:2: error: unknown type name ‘Author’
bookstore.c:21:2: error: unknown type name ‘Book’

These are produced because you have to define them before you use them. Move the struct "Author" & "Books" above the struct "Book". This will solve it.

Also the warning you are getting explains why there is a problem, the compiler identifies "typedef struct Author" as not necessary because you are not properly typedef the struct so there is nothing useful for the compiler to "read".

Since you already know the answer should be in this form

typedef struct {
 ...
 ... 
 ...
} struct-name;

stick with that.

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