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I have this matrix:

Catergory  Reason          Species
[1,] "Decline"  "Genuine"       "24"   
[2,] "Improved" "Genuine"       "16"    
[3,] "Improved" "Misclassified" "24"   
[4,] "Decline"  "Misclassified" "16"   
[5,] "Decline"  "taxonomic"     "24"   
[6,] "Improved" "Taxonomic"     "16"   
[7,] "Decline"  "Unclear"       "24"   
[8,] "Improved" "Unclear"       "16"   

I want to make the third column numeric so I try:

Reasonstats[,3]<-as.numeric(Reasonstats[,3])

It doesn't give me any errors, but the values remain not numerical. If I just do

as.numeric(Reasonstats[,3])

it gives me a list of them as numeric and if I do

Reasonstats[,3]<-2

it subs in 2 fine.

Can anyone tell me where I'm going wrong?

Thank you

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A matrix can only contain data of one type, so since you have strings in your matrix, everything will be stored as characters. Try data.frames instead if you want different data types in each column. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 18 '13 at 10:06
    
@AnandaMahto you should post that as an answer. –  Carl Witthoft Jul 18 '13 at 11:56
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1 Answer 1

To understand "what's going wrong", you need to start with reading the help page for ?matrix, which would lead you to the help page for ?as.vector. Reading ?as.vector, you would find:

as.vector, a generic, attempts to coerce its argument into a vector of mode mode (the default is to coerce to whichever vector mode is most convenient)

A few examples to understand this:

A <- c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE)
A
# [1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
mode(A)
# [1] "logical"
B <- c(TRUE, TRUE, 0)
B
# [1] 1 1 0
as.logical(B)
# [1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
mode(B)
# [1] "numeric"
C <- c(TRUE, FALSE, "zero")
C
# [1] "TRUE"  "FALSE" "zero" 
mode(C)
# [1] "character"

So, understanding that as.vector cannot contain mixed atomic modes, we can conclude that a matrix (which is basically a vector with a dim attribute specifying the number of rows and columns) also cannot contain mixed atomic modes.

Reading about more storage structures in R, you will encounter the data.frame. The help page for ?data.frame describes this as:

... a matrix-like structure whose columns may be of differing types (numeric, logical, factor and character and so on).

So, if you want a rectangular table like you have shown, but with columns of different types, you should use a data.frame, not a matrix.

Assuming your matrix to be "m", defined as:

m <- structure(
  c("Decline", "Improved", "Improved", "Decline", "Decline", 
    "Improved", "Decline", "Improved", "Genuine", "Genuine", 
    "Misclassified", "Misclassified", "taxonomic", "Taxonomic",
    "Unclear", "Unclear", "24", "16", "24", "16", "24", "16", 
    "24", "16"), 
  .Dim = c(8L, 3L), 
  .Dimnames = list(NULL, c("Catergory", "Reason", "Species")))

First, convert it to a data.frame:

m2 <- data.frame(m, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

Then convert your "Species" column to numeric:

m2$Species <- as.numeric(m2$Species)

Here's the result, and its structure.

m2
#   Catergory        Reason Species
# 1   Decline       Genuine      24
# 2  Improved       Genuine      16
# 3  Improved Misclassified      24
# 4   Decline Misclassified      16
# 5   Decline     taxonomic      24
# 6  Improved     Taxonomic      16
# 7   Decline       Unclear      24
# 8  Improved       Unclear      16
str(m2)
# 'data.frame':  8 obs. of  3 variables:
#  $ Catergory: chr  "Decline" "Improved" "Improved" "Decline" ...
#  $ Reason   : chr  "Genuine" "Genuine" "Misclassified" "Misclassified" ...
#  $ Species  : num  24 16 24 16 24 16 24 16
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