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So I read a paper that said that processing your dataset correctly can increase LibSVM classification accuracy dramatically...I'm using the Weka implementation and would like some help making sure my dataset is optimal.

Here are my (example) attributes:

Power Numeric (real numbers, range is from 0 to 1.5132, 9000+ unique values)
Voltage Numeric (similar to Power)
Light Numeric (0 and 1 are the only 2 possible values)
Day Numeric (1 through 20 are the possible values, equal number of each value)
Range Nominal {1,2,3,4,5} <----these are the classes

My question is: which Weka pre-processing filters should I apply to make this dataset more effective for LibSVM?

  1. Should I normalize and/or standardize the Power and Voltage data values?
  2. Should I use a Discretization filter on anything?
  3. Should I be binning the Power/Voltage values into a lot smaller number of bins?
  4. Should I make the Light value Binary instead of numeric?
  5. Should I normalize the Day values? Does it even make sense to do that?
  6. Should I be using the Nominal to Binary or Nominal to some thing else filter for the classes "Range"?

Please advice on these questions and anything else you think I might have missed...

Thanks in advance!!

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You should always standardize all features or normalize all training samples before feeding them to an SVM. The rest depends on the dataset and what the attributes mean (is Day a categorical variable?). –  larsmans Jul 18 '13 at 10:48
    
Yes it is a categorical variable, so how should I handle/process that? Should I make it a nominal variable instead? Should I scale them all to be between 0 and 1? I don't want there to be a further distance between Day 1 and Day 20 though. I want all Day features to be equally different from each other... –  stellarowl12 Jul 18 '13 at 18:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Normalization is very important, as it influences the concept of distance which is used by SVM. The two main approaches to normalization are:

  1. Scale each input dimension to the same interval, for example [0, 1]. This is the most common approach by far. It is necessary to prevent some input dimensions to completely dominate others. Recommended by the LIBSVM authors in their beginner's guide (Appendix B for examples).
  2. Scale each instance to a given length. This is common in text mining / computer vision.

As to handling types of inputs:

  1. Continuous: no work needed, SVM works on these implicitly.
  2. Ordinal: treat as continuous variables. For example cold, lukewarm, hot could be modeled as 1, 2, 3 without implicitly defining an unnatural structure.
  3. Nominal: perform one-hot encoding, e.g. for an input with N levels, generate N new binary input dimensions. This is necessary because you must avoid implicitly defining a varying distance between nominal levels. For example, modelling cat, dog, bird as 1, 2 and 3 implies that a dog and bird are more similar than a cat and bird which is nonsense.

Normalization must be done after substituting inputs where necessary.


To answer your questions:

  1. Should I normalize and/or standardize the Power and Voltage data values?

    Yes, standardize all (final) input dimensions to the same interval (including dummies!).

  2. Should I use a Discretization filter on anything?

    No.

  3. Should I be binning the Power/Voltage values into a lot smaller number of bins?

    No. Treat them as continuous variables (e.g. one input each).

  4. Should I make the Light value Binary instead of numeric?

    No, SVM has no concept of binary variables and treats everything as numeric. So converting it will just lead to an extra type-cast internally.

  5. Should I normalize the Day values? Does it even make sense to do that?

    If you want to use 1 input dimension, you must normalize it just like all others.

  6. Should I be using the Nominal to Binary or Nominal to some thing else filter for the classes "Range"?

    Nominal to binary, using one-hot encoding.

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This is VERY helpful...I have a few follow-up questions though. Say my Day variable is actually categorical (it can only be discrete values from 1 to 20). Should I normalize it to be between [0, 1] OR should I make it nominal and perform one-hot encoding. In which case I assume it would look like (1,0,0,0,0...), (0,1,0,0...) etc. Day 1 and Day 20 should be no more different than Day 1 and Day 2. –  stellarowl12 Jul 18 '13 at 18:57
    
At question 1., I suppose you mean standardize instead of normalize? –  larsmans Jul 18 '13 at 19:22
    
And just to make sure, my 'Day' variable is an INPUT...does that mean I SHOULD NOT make it into nominal and then use one-hot encoding on it? Or can I still do that? –  stellarowl12 Jul 18 '13 at 19:28
    
@stellarowl12 you can still do that. larsmans: yes, editted my answer. –  Marc Claesen Jul 18 '13 at 19:32
    
Another question, should my Light variable be Numeric or Nominal, or does it not matter? And why does it/does it not matter? Thanks so much!! –  stellarowl12 Jul 18 '13 at 19:51

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