Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As a kind of exercise I want to implement the string comparison a short as possible. The code is below:

#include <stdio.h>

int strcmp(const char* a, const char* b)
{
     for(;a && b && *a && *b && *a++==*b++;);return *a==*b;
}


int main ()
{
    const char* s1 = "this is line";
    const char* s2 = "this is line2";
    const char* s3 = "this is";
    const char* s4 = "this is line";


    printf("Test 1: %d\n", strcmp(s1, s2));
    printf("Test 2: %d\n", strcmp(s1, s3));
    printf("Test 3: %d\n", strcmp(s1, s4));
    printf("Test 4: %d\n", strcmp(s1, s1));
    printf("Test 5: %d\n", strcmp(s2, s2));

    return 0;
}

The result is:

Test 1: 0
Test 2: 0
Test 3: 1
Test 4: 0
Test 5: 0

What is going wrong in the case of comparison of the string with itself?

NOTE: I know that there is a shorter solution, but I want to find it by myself.

EDIT: Compiler is gcc under Ubuntu.

share|improve this question
2  
Do you need () to seperate &&? –  Annie Kim Jul 18 '13 at 10:47
1  
I run your code in vs2008 and the result is 0 0 1 1 1. –  Annie Kim Jul 18 '13 at 10:49
5  
Please don't call your functions the same as functions in the standard library if they don't provide the same functionality. You will break many things in subtle ways when you do that. –  Art Jul 18 '13 at 10:50
    
why not doing using <string> file? may be its a same name function as that in library thats why giving creepy results. –  user2560622 Jul 18 '13 at 10:50
    
@AmoghDikshit, because (a) The OP wants to do this as an exercise and (b) this is c and not c++ ;) –  StoryTeller Jul 18 '13 at 10:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Please don't call your functions the same as functions in the standard library if they don't provide the same functionality. You will break many things in subtle ways when you do that. Apparently that was the bug here.

To add a few more useful comments here. Use a while loop instead. Don't check for arguments being NULL, that's bad style and even if the for loop ends because of that, the return statement will crash anyway because it will dereference NULL.

share|improve this answer

I tested your code with GCC-4.4.7 and it get same result. GCC page describes optimization for strcmp http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/optimize.html

GCC could optimize strcmp (and memcmp) where one string is constant to compare successive bytes to known constant ones inline.

Rename your function and you will get your expected result as below:

$ cc yourcode.c
$ ./a.out 
Test 1: 0
Test 2: 0
Test 3: 1
Test 4: 0
Test 5: 0
$ cc -D strcmp=strcmp1 yourcode.c
$ ./a.out 
Test 1: 0
Test 2: 0
Test 3: 1
Test 4: 1
Test 5: 1
share|improve this answer

If you find two charactes that are not equal, you increment the pointers a and b nevertheless and then you return *a==*b so you return the result of comparing the characters behind the place where the strings differ. Better do it like that:

for(;*a && *b && *a==*b; a++, b++) ;
return *a==*b;

And please, please rename your function. it is evereything but strcmp.

EDIT that doesn't explain test case 4, but that's explained by the use of the function name strcmp() as the other answers tell.

share|improve this answer

heres a correct strcmp

int             my_strcmp(char *str1, char *str2)
{
  int           i;

  i = 0;
  while (str1[i] || str2[i])
    {
      if (str1[i] != str2[i])
        return (str1[i] - str2[i]);
      i++;
    }
  return (0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The keyword is short –  Alex Jul 18 '13 at 11:12
    
it will be more clear and use the same ressources –  Saxtheowl Jul 18 '13 at 11:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.