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I have written the next algorithm (for Android/NDK) to apply levels to a bitmap. The problem is that is really very slow, on a fast device such as the SGSIII can take up to 4 seconds for a 8MP image. And on devices with ARMv6 takes ages (over 10 seconds). Is there any way to optimize it?

void applyLevels(unsigned int *rgb, const unsigned int width, const unsigned int height, const float exposure, const float brightness, const float contrast, const float saturation)
{
    float R, G, B;

    unsigned int pixelIndex = 0;

    float exposureFactor   = powf(2.0f, exposure);
    float brightnessFactor = brightness / 10.0f;
    float contrastFactor   = contrast > 0.0f ? contrast : 0.0f;

    for (int y = 0; y < height; y++)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < width; x++)
        {
            const int pixelValue = buffer[pixelIndex];

            R = ((pixelValue & 0xff0000) >> 16) / 255.0f;
            G = ((pixelValue & 0xff00) >> 8) / 255.0f;
            B = (pixelValue & 0xff) / 255.0f;

            // Clamp values

            R = R > 1.0f ? 1.0f : R < 0.0f ? 0.0f : R;
            G = G > 1.0f ? 1.0f : G < 0.0f ? 0.0f : G;
            B = B > 1.0f ? 1.0f : B < 0.0f ? 0.0f : B;

            // Exposure

            R *= exposureFactor;
            G *= exposureFactor;
            B *= exposureFactor;

            // Contrast

            R = (((R - 0.5f) * contrastFactor) + 0.5f);
            G = (((G - 0.5f) * contrastFactor) + 0.5f);
            B = (((B - 0.5f) * contrastFactor) + 0.5f);

            // Saturation

            float gray = (R * 0.3f) + (G * 0.59f) + (B * 0.11f);
            R = gray * (1.0f - saturation) + R * saturation;
            G = gray * (1.0f - saturation) + G * saturation;
            B = gray * (1.0f - saturation) + B * saturation;

            // Brightness

            R += brightnessFactor;
            G += brightnessFactor;
            B += brightnessFactor;

            // Clamp values

            R = R > 1.0f ? 1.0f : R < 0.0f ? 0.0f : R;
            G = G > 1.0f ? 1.0f : G < 0.0f ? 0.0f : G;
            B = B > 1.0f ? 1.0f : B < 0.0f ? 0.0f : B;

            // Store new pixel value

            R *= 255.0f;
            G *= 255.0f;
            B *= 255.0f;

            buffer[pixelIndex] = ((int)R << 16) | ((int)G << 8) | (int)B;

            pixelIndex++;
        }
    }
}
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closed as off-topic by TemplateRex, Tadeusz Kopec, Paul Annetts, Yan Sklyarenko, jh314 Jul 18 '13 at 13:44

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You should get rid of the / 255.0 and * 255.0 for each R/G/B value and use 255.0 instead of 1.0 as the max value. This will eliminate costly division operations. You might also want to look at using NEON, as this is an obvious candidate for SIMD. –  Paul R Jul 18 '13 at 11:59
5  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about codereview. You could post at codereview.stackexchange.com –  TemplateRex Jul 18 '13 at 11:59
    
Try doing it without floats and seeing if plain integer math is precise enough. After all, you're starting and ending with 8-bit integers anyway. –  Eric Finn Jul 18 '13 at 12:03
1  
Surely the clamp values in the beginning is completely useless, as the value is masked to 255 and divided by 255.0 - no chance that it will be negative or above 1. Of course, using fixed point math would be a better choice. Second "clamp values" seems to be in the wrong place (and that is, of course, required, as the multiplications/additions may have pushed it outside the range) –  Mats Petersson Jul 18 '13 at 12:05

4 Answers 4

Most of your computations can be trivially tabled... the whole processing can become

for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    int px = buffer[i];
    int r = tab1[(px >> 16) & 255];
    int g = tab1[(px >> 8) & 255];
    int b = tab1[px & 255];
    gray = (kr*r + kg*g + kb*b) >> 16;
    grayval = tsat1[gray];
    r = brtab[tsat2[r] + grayval];
    g = brtab[tsat2[g] + grayval];
    b = brtab[tsat2[b] + grayval];
    buffer[i] = (r << 16) | (g << 16) | b;
}

where

  • tab1 is a table of 256 bytes tabling the result of exposure and constrast processing
  • tsat1 and tsat2 are 256 bytes tables for saturation processing
  • brtab is a 512-bytes table for brightness processing

Note that without saturation processing you would need just a lookup per component in a 256 bytes table.

A huge speed problem can be because you are using floating-point computations where there is no dedicated hardware for it. Software implementation of floating point is really slow.

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You're reducing your fast int based RGB values to slower floats and then using a lot of floating point multiplication for your adjustments. Better to multiply your adjustments (brightness, saturation etc...) by 256 and store them as ints, and don't use any floating point in your inner loop.

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(1.0f - saturation) is the same everywhere, therefore you can just assign it to a variable.

Instead of >> 16) / 255.0f and >> 8) / 255.0f you can convert them to single multiplications. Or, you can divide them by 256 instead of 255 with >> 10 and >> 8 respectively:

 R = ((pixelValue & 0xff0000) >> 10);
 G = ((pixelValue & 0xff00) >> 2);
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Several point to optimize that code

  1. Favor integer computation, that mean that instead of transforming your RGB data from [0, 255] to [0, 1] do the inverse and transform all your contrast, brightness etc to be between 0 and 255

  2. clipping operation can often be simplify with a clipping table to remove if-else statement .

    R = clip[R'];

  3. I notice a strange clipping section

        // Clamp values
    
        R = R > 255.0f ? 255.0f : R < 0.0f ? 0.0f : R;
        G = G > 255.0f ? 255.0f : G < 0.0f ? 0.0f : G;
        B = B > 255.0f ? 255.0f : B < 0.0f ? 0.0f : B;
    

here it look like your are still in [0, 1] range so it useless !

  1. at the end review your formula because it seems that exposure and brightness can be fact prize to remove some op.

Finally that code is a good candidate for SIMD and MIMD, so look if MMX/SSE or OpenMP can solve your performance issue.

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