Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this file:

main.c
A.h
A.c
B.h
B.c
X.h

and in main.c I include A and in A.h I include B and in B.h I include X.h How could I write makefile for this? please tell me about dependency diagram of this example

share|improve this question
    
In A.c do you include A.h? In B.c do you include B.h? –  Beta Jul 19 '13 at 0:35

1 Answer 1

Try this:

main: main.o A.o B.o
    gcc -o main main.o A.o B.o

%.o: %.c
    gcc -c $<

While compiling the .c files you don't have to worry about dependencies yet, only when linking the executable.

share|improve this answer
    
what % mean here? (mean any?) –  Aryan Jul 18 '13 at 12:40
    
Yes, % is a placeholder that matches anything. The $< thing in the gcc command stands for the source file (what stands right of the colon, in this case, the .c file). There is also a variable $@ that stands for the target file (left of the colon), but we do not need it here because gcc automatically saves the compilation result of name.c as name.o. –  Ulrich Schmidt-Goertz Jul 18 '13 at 12:46
    
@Aryan.. You need to learn the basics of Makefile http://sagarsakre.blogspot.com/2012/09/understanding-makefile-for-beginners.htm‌​l –  Sagar Sakre Jul 19 '13 at 3:43
    
Thanks @SagarSakre. It was useful. –  Aryan Jul 19 '13 at 6:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.