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I am having some troubles with the Adorner of WPF. My adorner is ok, but I don't get it displayed at the very moment I want to.

I like to do something like:

    public void MyAction()
    {
        // property bound to the adorner VisibiltyProperty
        // I like the happen a refresh now
        // (code is wired correct, if I finish method here, the adorner is drawn)
        this.IsAdornerEnabled = true;

        try
        {
           ... doing some long lasting things I cannot do async cause it depends on a lot of objects owned by main thread...
        }
        finally
        {
            // I like the adorner to be removed from UI now
            this.IsAdornerEnabled = false;
        }
    }

The IsAdornerEnabled Property is correct bound to the adorner and makes a notification to it. But in this code the adorner is painted and removed for a split second when the method terminates.

How is it possible to get it rendered before the UI is thread is blocked?

Any help is very appreciated.

Explanation: I like to use the adorner to create a non-clickable, half transparent pane over my main tab with a text like "loading module" on it. While my MainThread is navigating with magellan, resolving dependencies with castle and then creating a lof of DevExpress controls, I like to show this pane. Then I remove it again. I can create the adorner, that's no problem. The adorner works in my prototyping project, where I don't do any other things.

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It make sense as your progress is not async enabling the adorner create a notification and so on but since you are blocking the (UI?) thread, no one can draw hence no adorner is rendered. –  Samuel Jul 18 '13 at 13:47
    
That's what I'm asking, how can I force my application to render the adorner before I block the UI thread? –  this.myself Jul 18 '13 at 14:12
    
The adorder is it suppose to work like an progressbar ? –  Tan Jul 18 '13 at 14:49
    
At least for the moment, it does not have to behave like a progressbar. It's just an overloay. But you newer know what ideas the customer has next ;-) –  this.myself Jul 19 '13 at 7:31
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2 Answers

Try this.

    public void MyAction()
{
    // property bound to the adorner VisibiltyProperty
    // I like the happen a refresh now
    // (code is wired correct, if I finish method here, the adorner is drawn)
    this.IsAdornerEnabled = true;

    try
    {
        this.Dispatcher.Invoke( (Action)(() => 
        { 
            // Do your work here,





            this.IsAdornerEnabled = false;
        })); 
    }catch {
    }

}
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Unfortunatly, this code should be in the ViewModel class where no Dispatcher exists... What I already tried is to call the Dispatcher on this.AdornedElement and calling the Dispatcher in xaml.cs by callback. But painting is still not done. –  this.myself Jul 19 '13 at 7:30
    
Ok so you are using MVVM ? –  Tan Jul 19 '13 at 7:46
    
Then you really have to use Async calls.blog.mycupof.net/2012/08/23/… look at this –  Tan Jul 19 '13 at 7:47
    
I would love to use an async call for my long going things. But the long going things uses a lot of objects owned by the UI thread. I tried to use it async, but the task terminated with an exception saying the objects are owned by another thread... –  this.myself Jul 19 '13 at 8:56
    
But then you are breaking the MVVM rules right ? What things do u mean with UI are u accessing elements from the UI in the viewmodel ? –  Tan Jul 19 '13 at 9:18
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found the solution for my answer. It might no be the ultra clean way, but it works for me.

ViewModel:

    private void LoadUi()
    {
        try
        {
            this.IsAdornerVisible = true;
            RefreshCallback();

            ... some long going view initialization...
        }
        finally
        {
            this.IsAdornerVisible = false;
        }
}

RefreshCallback is a property of type action, set by a method in code behind of the xaml. The method set to the RefreshCallback is this one:

    private void Refresh()
    {
        this.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => { }), DispatcherPriority.ContextIdle, null);
    }

The invoke on the dispatcher with ContextIdle makes that the rendering is done before the empty action is executed. With ContextIdle this works good. Before I tried other values of DispatcherPriority, for example Render. Did not work. Now I'm happy it works and weekend can begin.

The solution I found here: Source of my solution: Update the WPF UI now: how to wait for the rendering to finish

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