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In my application I have a lot of small files that are saved in a certain path structure. I am creating a container file where I want to store all existing files starting with a header that contains information like offset of each file or file size. I am writing to this file with a BinaryWriter. But there are a lot of duplicates that are only added to my container file once. Therefore I create a hash value for each file and compare it to existing hash values in a data table. This works just like it should, but I want to know wether this is good practice or not because there could be a huge amount of data. Are there better or more performant ways to achieve my goal?

Here is my actual code:

// I parsed through my files and created my header
// all file paths were added to my tileList
DataTable dtImageInfos = new DataTable();
dtImageInfos.Columns.Add("tilename", typeof(String));
dtImageInfos.Columns.Add("hash", typeof(String));
dtImageInfos.Columns.Add("offset", typeof(long));

foreach (String tile in tileList)
{                            
    FileInfo f = new FileInfo(tile);
    int tileSize = Convert.ToInt32(f.Length);

    if (tileSize <= MAX_CHECK_SIZE)
    {
        Image tileImg = Image.FromFile(tile);
        String tileHash = createHashForImage(tileImg);
        DataTable dtCheck = dtImageInfos.Clone();                                 

        if (dtImageInfos.Rows.Count > 0)
            dtImageInfos.AsEnumerable().Where(t => t.Field<String>("hash").Equals(tileHash))
                            .CopyToDataTable(dtCheck, LoadOption.OverwriteChanges);c#                                

        if (dtCheck.Rows.Count == 0)
        {
            writer.Write(tileOffset);

            DataRow drNew = dtImageInfos.NewRow();
            drNew["tilename"] = tile;
            drNew["hash"] = tileHash;
            drNew["offset"] = tileOffset;
            dtImageInfos.Rows.Add(drNew);

            tileOffset += tileSize;
        }
        else
        {
            DataRow drCheck = dtCheck.Rows[0];
            writer.Write((long)drCheck["offset"]);
        }              
    }
    else
    {
        writer.Write(tileOffset);

        DataRow drNew = dtImageInfos.NewRow();
        drNew["tilename"] = tile;
        drNew["hash"] = "";
        drNew["offset"] = tileOffset;
        dtImageInfos.Rows.Add(drNew);

        tileOffset += tileSize;
    }
    writer.Write(tileSize);                            
}

foreach (DataRow drTile in dtImageInfos.Rows)
{
    byte[] tileData = File.ReadAllBytes(drTile["tilename"].ToString());
    writer.Write(tileData);
}

I hope I could make my issue understandable. Thanks in advance

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You explained what you do, without knowing why you do this there is no proper way to answer this. Does it perform fast enough for you? Do you experience performance related issues? I doubt many people like to read other people's uncommented code. –  Samuel Jul 18 '13 at 14:11
    
A device for storing a huge amount of persistent data is called a database. Use a database. –  Eric Lippert Jul 18 '13 at 14:47
    
OP is trying to create his own archive file format, .NET 4.5 has ZipFile and ZipArchive that only take a few lines of code to archive/compress and retrieve a directory of files (tile images). –  LastCoder Jul 18 '13 at 14:49
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1 Answer

Using the latest version of c#.NET you can avoid a lot of over head just using a Zip File.

System.IO.Compression.ZipFile.CreateFromDirectory(folderPathWithTiles, containerPath);

You can access the different file (tiles) in your zip archive (container file) with the .OpenRead method.

using (ZipArchive tiles = ZipFile.OpenRead(containerPath))
{
    ZipArchiveEntry tile = tiles.GetEntry(relativeTilePath);
    Image tileImage = Image.FromStream(tile.Open());
}

ZipFile: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.compression.zipfile.aspx

ZipArchive: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.compression.ziparchive.aspx

ZipArchiveEntry: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.compression.ziparchiveentry.aspx

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