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I want to display UIView on the bottom of the screen in portrait mode, so when a phone is rotated and horizontal orientation would reposition/resize all subviews, that one UIView would remain where it was, with the same size and original position (i.e. on the right end of horizontal orientation if it was on the bottom of portrait mode).

Is there a good way to do it?

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1  
I'm not pro in autolayout, but looks like handle changing orientation is an only way. Also this question must be helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/6104963/… – kaspartus Jul 18 '13 at 14:44
    
I think the only way to do this will be to not allow rotation for this controller, and then apply a transform to the part of the screen that you want to rotate. – rdelmar Jul 18 '13 at 15:12
    
Do you want any subviews of this view you want to stay put to also not rotate? So, everything will be on its side in this view? – rdelmar Jul 18 '13 at 15:15
    
Subviews can rotate but stay in the same position where they are. I've seen it in Camera! app where shutter button container is always where Home button is despite orientation. – Vad Jul 18 '13 at 15:19
    
That could get complicated, but it depends on what this view is. Please give more detail on what this view looks like. – rdelmar Jul 18 '13 at 15:30

You can set the autoresizing mask like this:

myView.autorezisingmask = UIViewAutorezingMaskFlexibleTopMargin;

This will keep the view at the bottom.

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This will rotate the view. Yes - it will stay on the bottom of horizontal mode but I want it to stay on RIGHT of horizontal mode – Vad Jul 18 '13 at 15:10
    
@Vad I am a little confused by what you mean by staying at the right, could you please clarify? – Oscar Gomez Jul 18 '13 at 15:12
    
Simply said, I want a container to stick to the corner where Home button always is. So, if you are in Portrait mode - it is on the bottom of screen, if you are in Horizontal mode - it is on the right or left of the screen. – Vad Jul 18 '13 at 15:16

I can think of several ways to do this. One way, that I show below relies solely on using constraints. For this to work the 3 buttons should not be in their own transparent view, but just be subviews of the view you want to rotate (that is self.view in my example). I don't think the original constraints to these 3 buttons matters, because I remove them on rotation, but the constraints I started with had the center button with a centerX constraint, a fixed distance to the bottom, standard horizontal distances to the left and right buttons, and all three buttons had their baselines aligned. In viewDidLoad I loop through all of self.view's constraints and identify all that have to do with these buttons, and put them into an array so I can remove them and add them back later.

@interface ViewController ()
@property (strong,nonatomic) NSMutableArray *portraitConstraints;
@property (strong,nonatomic) NSMutableArray *landscapeConstraints;
@end

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    self.portraitConstraints = [NSMutableArray array];
    self.landscapeConstraints = [NSMutableArray array];
    for (NSLayoutConstraint *con in self.view.constraints) {
        if (con.firstItem == self.leftButton || con.secondItem == self.leftButton || con.firstItem == self.centerButton || con.secondItem == self.centerButton || con.firstItem == self.rightButton || con.secondItem == self.rightButton) {
            [self.portraitConstraints addObject:con];
        }
    }
}

- (void)willAnimateRotationToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration {

    switch (interfaceOrientation) {
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight:{
            [self.view removeConstraints:self.portraitConstraints];
            [self.view removeConstraints:self.landscapeConstraints];
            [self.landscapeConstraints removeAllObjects];
            NSLayoutConstraint *centerYCon = [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self.centerButton attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY relatedBy:0 toItem:self.view attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY multiplier:1 constant:0];
            NSLayoutConstraint *rightCon = [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self.centerButton attribute:NSLayoutAttributeRight relatedBy:0 toItem:self.view attribute:NSLayoutAttributeRight multiplier:1 constant:-8];
            NSArray *stackCons= [NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[left]-[center]-[right]" options:NSLayoutFormatAlignAllLeading metrics:nil views:@{@"left":self.leftButton, @"center":self.centerButton, @"right":self.rightButton}];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObject:centerYCon];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObject:rightCon];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObjectsFromArray:stackCons];
            [self.view addConstraints:self.landscapeConstraints];
            break;
        }
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft:{
            [self.view removeConstraints:self.portraitConstraints];
            [self.view removeConstraints:self.landscapeConstraints];
            [self.landscapeConstraints removeAllObjects];
            NSLayoutConstraint *centerYCon2 = [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self.centerButton attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY relatedBy:0 toItem:self.view attribute:NSLayoutAttributeCenterY multiplier:1 constant:0];
            NSLayoutConstraint *leftCon = [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self.centerButton attribute:NSLayoutAttributeLeft relatedBy:0 toItem:self.view attribute:NSLayoutAttributeLeft multiplier:1 constant:8];
            NSArray *stackCons2= [NSLayoutConstraint constraintsWithVisualFormat:@"V:[left]-[center]-[right]" options:NSLayoutFormatAlignAllLeading metrics:nil views:@{@"left":self.leftButton, @"center":self.centerButton, @"right":self.rightButton}];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObject:centerYCon2];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObject:leftCon];
            [self.landscapeConstraints addObjectsFromArray:stackCons2];
            [self.view addConstraints:self.landscapeConstraints];
            break;
        }
        case UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait:{
            [self.view removeConstraints:self.landscapeConstraints];
            [self.view addConstraints:self.portraitConstraints];
            break;
        }
        default:
            break;
    }
}
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But constraits won't work for iOS 5, will they? – Vad Jul 18 '13 at 18:42
    
@Vad, no, they won't. It would have been good of you to mention the fact that you need to support iOS 5 in your question (although I don't know why you would want to. With iOS 7 coming out soon, I would think iOS 6 and iOS 7 would be all you need to support). – rdelmar Jul 18 '13 at 18:46
    
I see. thanks... – Vad Jul 18 '13 at 18:47

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