Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a piece of code like

List<int> foo = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
IEnumerable<int> bar = foo.Where(x => x % 2 == 1);

bar is of type System.Linq.Enumerable.WhereListIterator<int> due to deferred execution. Since it implements IEnumerable<int> it is possible to convert it to a List<int>using ToList(). However, I have been unable to identify some parts of the code that is run when ToList() is called. I am using dotPeek as a decompiler and this is my first time attempting such a thing, so correct me if i made any mistakes on the way.

I will describe what I found so far below (All assemblies are Version 4.0.0.0):

  1. Enumerable.WhereArrayIterator<TSource> is implemented in the file Enumerable.cs of the namespace System.Linq in the assembly System.Core. The class neither defines ToList() itself nor does it implement IEnumerable<TSource>. It implements Enumerable.Iterator<TSource> which is located in the same file. Enumerable.Iterator<TSource> does implement IEnumerable<TSource>.

  2. ToList() is an extension mewthod that is also located in Enumerable.cs. All it does is null checking and then calling the constructor of List<TSource> with its argument.

  3. List<T> is defined in the file List.cs of the namespace System.Collections.Generic in the assembly mscorlib. The constructor that is called by ToList() has the signature public List(IEnumerable<T> collection). It once again null checks and then casts the argument to ICollection<T>. If the collection has no elements, its creates a new list of an empty array, otherwise it uses the ICollection.CopyTo() method to create the new list.

  4. ICollection<T> is defined in mscorlib \ System.Collections.Generic \ ICollection.cs. It implements IEnumerable in its generic and non-generic form.

This is where I am stuck. Neither Enumerable.WhereArrayIterator<TSource> nor Enumerable.Iterator<TSource> implement ICollection, so somewhere, a cast has to happen and I am unable to locate the code that is run when CopyTo() is called.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you're getting confused by the as operator. It's basically a safe cast. It's equivalent to this, but a bit faster:

MyEndType x = null;
if (MyVarWithAs is MyEndType) x = (MyEndType)MyVarWithAs;

Now, let's look at the code again now.

 public List(IEnumerable<T> collection)
    {
      if (collection == null)
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentNullException(ExceptionArgument.collection);
      ICollection<T> collection1 = collection as ICollection<T>;
      if (collection1 != null)
      {
        int count = collection1.Count;
        if (count == 0)
        {
          this._items = List<T>._emptyArray;
        }
        else
        {
          this._items = new T[count];
          collection1.CopyTo(this._items, 0);
          this._size = count;
        }
      }
      else
      {
        this._size = 0;
        this._items = List<T>._emptyArray;
        foreach (T obj in collection)
          this.Add(obj);
      }
    }

As you can see, in the if it checks if it's null. If it's null, it means that it is not an ICollection<T>, so then it goes to the else. All the else does is set everything to the default, and then adds everything in manually. When you pass in an IEnumerable<T> that is not an ICollection<T> (like in your example) it will go through the else path.

share|improve this answer

This is the relevant part in the List<T> constructor (ILSpy):

ICollection<T> collection2 = collection as ICollection<T>; // this won't succeed
if (collection2 != null) 
{
    int count = collection2.Count;
    this._items = new T[count];
    collection2.CopyTo(this._items, 0);
    this._size = count;
    return;
}
// this will be used instead
this._size = 0;
this._items = new T[4];
using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = collection.GetEnumerator())
{
    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        this.Add(enumerator.Current);
    }
}

So you see that collection as ICollection<T>; tries to cast to ICollection<T>, if that works the efficient CopyTo will be used, otherwise the sequence will be enumerated entirely.

Your WhereListIterator<int> is a query and not a collection, so it cannot be casted to ICollection<T>, hence it will be enumerated.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.