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I have a problem in C where I don't get to a solution...

I've written a server- and a client-application in C.

The server-application reads a file and cuts it into chunks of 1024 bytes to send it via UDP to the client application.

The client-application gets these chunks, creates and writes the new file.

If the input-file is a text file the applications are working.

For the project I'm currently working on I need to send media files (.mp3, .mp4, .ogg etc.) as well (Yes, I need to use UDP for that). If I want to send files like these it's not working.

My problems:

  • When I get the data via a UDP socket I get 1024 of data every time I receive a message - except with the last package. The application saves the data it gets via UDP in a char array. To get the lenght of the message, I check the array for empty fields. (I tried different, but it didn't work...) Works fine for text-files, but not for media-files. How can I do this better? (Probably not only inefficent but bad coding style, too...)

    int l = 0;
    n = 0;
    for(l = 0; l<sizeof(buffer) ;l++){
    
        if(buffer[l] != NULL){
            n++;
        }
    
    }
    
  • What do I have to do to send non-text data correctly? Is there a better solution for sending files via UDP? Does anyone have some advice?

Here are my to C-files:

server.c

#include<arpa/inet.h>
#include<netinet/in.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

#define PORT 9333   
#define SERVER_IP "127.0.0.1"   
#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024 

FILE *input;
FILE *checkfile; 
int n; 
int count = 0; 

struct sockaddr_in remote;  
int s;              


int main(){

unsigned char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
    char check[100];

printf("Press ENTER to send file!\n");
fgets(check, 100, stdin);


input = fopen("input.txt", "r");
checkfile = fopen("checkfile.txt", "w");

if(input){

    if((s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP)) == -1){
        fprintf(stderr, "Error getting a socket! \n");
        exit(-1);
    }

    memset((char *) &remote, 0, sizeof(remote));

    remote.sin_family = AF_INET;
    remote.sin_port = htons(PORT);


    if(inet_aton(SERVER_IP, &remote.sin_addr) == 0){
        fprintf(stderr, "maybe no valid adress\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    while(!feof(input)){
        n = fread(buffer, 1, BUFFER_SIZE, input);
        count += n;
        printf("n = %d\n", n);

        if(sendto(s, buffer, n, 0, &remote, sizeof(remote)) == -1){
            fprintf(stderr, "error while sending data!\n");
            exit(-1);
        }
        fwrite(buffer, 1, n, checkfile);
    }
    printf("%d bytes sent. \n", count);

}else{
    printf("error while opening input file!");
}
printf("File sent!!\n");

close(s);
fclose(input);

return 0;
}

client.c:

#include<arpa/inet.h>
#include<netinet/in.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<sys/socket.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

#define PORT 9333
#define BUFFER_SIZE 1024

int n;
FILE *output;

struct sockaddr_in local, remote;
int len_remote = sizeof(remote);
int s;
int count = 0;

int main(){

char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
output = fopen("output.txt", "w");

if((s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP)) == -1){
    fprintf(stderr, "Error getting a socket!\n");
    exit(-1);
}

memset((char *) &remote, 0, sizeof(remote));
memset((char *) &local, 0, sizeof(remote));

local.sin_family = AF_INET;
local.sin_port = htons(PORT);
local.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);

if(bind(s, &local, sizeof(local)) == -1){
    fprintf(stderr, "Cannot connect to service!\n");
    exit(-1);
}

int flag = 1;   

while(flag == 1){

    memset(buffer, '\0', BUFFER_SIZE);

    if(recvfrom(s, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, 0, &remote, &len_remote) == -1){
        fprintf(stderr, "fail while receiving data! \n");
        exit(-1);
    }

    int l = 0;
    n = 0;
    for(l = 0; l<sizeof(buffer) ;l++){

        if(buffer[l] != NULL){
            n++;
        }

    }

    count += n;
    printf("n = %d\n", n);

    fwrite(buffer, 1, n, output);

    if(n<1024){
        flag = 0;
    }

}
printf("Got the file!\n");

close(s);
fclose(output);
return 0;

}

If someone has some help/advices for me, that would be great.

Best regards,

Phil

share|improve this question
    
create a 2 data files that demonstrates the problem (one that works, one that doesn't) and post the contents as a hex dump of each –  Mark Lakata Jul 18 '13 at 15:03
    
Before send actual file send files properties, wait –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 18 '13 at 15:10
    
let me know your operating system? Also please check the file size (at client/sever) both sides. if Size is same then change permission and properties of transferred file same at sender side –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 18 '13 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From client.c:

int   nbrecv = 0;    
while(flag == 1){

    memset(buffer, '\0', BUFFER_SIZE);

    if((nbrecv = recvfrom(s, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE, 0, &remote, &len_remote)) == -1){
        fprintf(stderr, "fail while receiving data! \n");
        exit(-1);
    }

    count += nbrecv;
    printf("n = %d\n", nbrecv);

    fwrite(buffer, 1, nbrecv, output);

    if(nbrecv<1024){
        flag = 0;
    }

}

recvfrom() will return the number of received bytes, use it.

Be aware that UDP doesn't have any guarantees (the packets are'nt re-ordered, or whatever). If you use UDP, you may want to create a basic protocol which will contain some informations (number of the packet, number of bytes in the packet, etc.).

share|improve this answer
    
Big thanks, that solved the problem. –  P. G. Jul 19 '13 at 9:05

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