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I was reading through the book "Beginning PHP and MYSQL" by W. Jason Gilmore and I came across a part that did not make sense to me. This was in the section about accessors and mutators in OOP.

class Employee
{
    var $name;
    var $city;
    protected $wage;

    function __get($propName)
    {
        echo "__get called!<br />";
        $vars = array("name","city");
        if (in_array($propName, $vars))
        {
            return $this->$propName;
        }else {
            return "No such variable!";
        }
    }


}

$employee = new Employee();
$employee->name = "Mario";

echo $employee->name."<br />";
echo $employee->age;

This returns the following:

Mario __get called! No such variable!

The first issue I had with this is that when the name property is set to "Mario" the accessor method is not run, I did a little searching and it appears that __get is only run when reading data from inaccessible properties, although this is never stated in the book. Is this why the __get method is not ran then?

The second question I had was in relation to the "if" statement. If the __get is truly only ran when attempting to read from inaccessible properties, why would you have an "if" inside it that checks to see if the property is already in your array of variables that are set? Surely it wouldn't be, or you wouldn't have got to the "if", correct?

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This isn't an answer but what it is with all of the "<br />'s"? You don't need a single one of them in this code. –  H2ONOCK Jul 18 '13 at 15:06
    
@H2ONOCK I imagine it's just to format the output a little for debugging purposes. –  Phas1c Jul 18 '13 at 15:09
    
@Phas1c an echo("<pre>"); would sort this out at the top of the class? Much easier. –  H2ONOCK Jul 18 '13 at 15:11
    
I think your book is a little bit outdated with its var references for properties; it might be better to find a more up-to-date tutorial –  Mark Baker Jul 18 '13 at 15:11
    
Imagine that you have many protected properties, and you're fetching a database record which populates even more, at the time of running, unknown properties. In order to protect the ones that are supposed to be hidden, you can use __get to implement that logic and only allow certain properties to be accessed. This is an example just from on top of my head used in order to answer "why would I have if in __get". –  N.B. Jul 18 '13 at 15:11

1 Answer 1

The magic __get and __set methods are only called in the event that the property is not accessible from the calling scope (either doesn't exist or is protected or private). In this case since your property exists and is public it is not performing the setter call.

To make the example work you will have to do the following:

class Employee
{
    protected $name;
    protected $city;
    protected $wage;

    function __set ($property, $value){
        $this->$property = $value;
    }
    function __get($propName)
    {
        echo "__get called!<br />";
        $vars = array("name","city");
        if (in_array($propName, $vars))
        {
            return $this->$propName;
        }else {
            return "No such variable!";
        }
    }


}

$employee = new Employee();
$employee->name = "Mario";

echo $employee->name."<br />";
echo $employee->age;

First off the properties where scoped as protected effectively hiding them from the calling scope. Then to allow the assignment ($employee->name = "Mario";) the magic setter was added __set.

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