Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method:

public HttpRequestMessage CreateRequest<T>(T genericObject = default(T))
{
    ...
    if (!Equals(genericObject, default(T)))
    ...
}

I can call it:

var request = CreateRequest<int>();

Seeing as I don't actually use the default type (I would like it to set to null by default), how can I stop defining the generic type as an int(or any other type for that matter) when I call the method?

Edit The point is, I usually do need to specify a type and use the argument. However sometimes I do not need to use the argument and I want it to be set to Null or Zero instead of writing a random type like 'int' in the example above

share|improve this question
1  
It's really not clear what you mean - the compiler needs some indication of what T should be... –  Jon Skeet Jul 18 '13 at 15:17
    
null isn't a type. You will need to specify what you expect the method to return or write a non-generic method with some return type. –  Romoku Jul 18 '13 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can not, cause that is a signature of your method.

You can create another method, which has no any generic arguments, so you will be able to call it like:

var request = CreateRequest();
share|improve this answer
    
This is the right answer! Generic methods need the object type reference always. If null it means it's not needed then you need a non Generic method. –  CarlosB Jul 18 '13 at 15:20
    
The point is, I usually do need to specify a type and use the argument. However sometimes I do not need to use the argument and I want it to be set to Null or Zero instead of writing a random type like 'int' in the example above. –  AntonJ Jul 18 '13 at 15:27
    
@AntonJ: it's architectural decision, so take in count how often you use it with and without parameter and add or not a method without any generic argument. It all depends on your convenience. –  Tigran Jul 18 '13 at 15:50

I don't think you can. For a generic function you either have to specify the generic parameter or you have to pass something that it can infer the generic parameter from.

To get around it you could write a non-generic wrapper.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.