Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to create an array which contains all text from a page without jQuery. This is my html:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Hello world!</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>Hello!</h1>
    <p>
        <div>What are you doing?</div>
        <div>Fine, and you?</div>
    </p>
    <a href="http://google.com">Thank you!</a>
</body>
</html>

Here is what i want to get

text[1] = "Hello world!";
text[2] = "Hello!";
text[3] = "What are you doing?";
text[4] = "Fine, and you?";
text[5] = "Thank you!";

Here is what i have tried but seems to not work correctly in my browser:

var elements = document.getElementsByTagName('*');
console.log(elements);

PS. I need to use document.getElementsByTagName('*'); and exclude "script" and "style".

share|improve this question
    
Can you use jQuery? –  Zach Leighton Jul 18 '13 at 15:40
    
no, without jQuery –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 15:41
    
var full_text = ''; $(':not(#anything)').each(function(index, element) { var text = $(element).text(); full_text.push(text); } –  Nick Jul 18 '13 at 15:41
1  
Seems to return all the elements for me in Chrome, and FF: jsfiddle.net/7JJdn –  Chad Jul 18 '13 at 15:42
    
thank you, but i can`t use jQuery .. –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 15:42
show 4 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  var array = [];

    var elements = document.body.getElementsByTagName("*");

    for(var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++) {
       var current = elements[i];
        if(current.children.length === 0 && current.textContent.replace(/ |\n/g,'') !== '') {
           // Check the element has no children && that it is not empty
           array.push(current.textContent);
        }
    } 

You could do something like this

Demo

result = ["What are you doing?", "Fine, and you?"]

or you could use document.documentElement.getElementsByTagName('*');

Also make sure your code is inside this

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function(){

   /// Code...
});

If it's just the title you need, you may aswell do this

array.push(document.title);

Saves looping through scripts & styles

share|improve this answer
    
That is what i pointed out –  Connor Jul 18 '13 at 15:50
    
TypeError: document.body is null var elements = document.body.getElementsByTagName("*"); –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 15:50
    
@Connor right - on the other hand, document.body.textContent is pretty much exactly what the OP wants (probably). –  Pointy Jul 18 '13 at 15:51
    
Yeah you need to do it in a domReady jsfiddle –  Connor Jul 18 '13 at 15:51
    
@Connor Your answer is good, but i need also the title to have in my array ... so i need document.getElementsByTagName("*") and exclude script tag as example. –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 15:58
show 4 more comments

If you want the contents of the entire page, you should be able to use

var allText = document.body.textContent;

In Internet Explorer before IE9, there was the property innerText which is similar but not identical. The MDN page about textContent has more detail.

Now one problem here is that textContent will get you the content of any <style> or <script> tags, which may or may not be what you want. If you don't want that, you could use something like this:

function getText(startingPoint) {
  var text = "";
  function gt(start) {
    if (start.nodeType === 3)
      text += start.nodeValue;
    else if (start.nodeType === 1)
      if (start.tagName != "SCRIPT" && start.tagName != "STYLE")
        for (var i = 0; i < start.childNodes.length; ++i)
          gt(start.childNodes[i]);
  }
  gt(startingPoint);
  return text;
}

Then:

var allText = getText(document.body);

Note: this (or document.body.innerText) will get you all the text, but in a depth-first order. Getting all the text from a page in the order that a human actually sees it once the page is rendered is a much more difficult problem, because it'd require the code to understand the visual effects (and visual semantics!) of the layout as dictated by CSS (etc).

edit — if you want the text "stored into an array", I suppose on a node-by-node basis (?), you'd simply substitute array appends for the string concatenation in the above:

function getTextArray(startingPoint) {
  var text = [];
  function gt(start) {
    if (start.nodeType === 3)
      text.push(start.nodeValue);
    else if (start.nodeType === 1)
      if (start.tagName != "SCRIPT" && start.tagName != "STYLE")
        for (var i = 0; i < start.childNodes.length; ++i)
          gt(start.childNodes[i]);
  }
  gt(startingPoint);
  return text;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that gat all text (except title), but it is not storred into an array. –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 16:11
    
well @smotru if you don't know how to store something into a array then your on the wrong page. I'm sure it's possible to look through other answers to see how they are storing it –  Connor Jul 18 '13 at 16:15
    
@Connor i know to store something into an array but i can`t understand Pointy`s script .. little comments should help .. –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 16:27
    
@smotru the script has been updated - it's just a recursive traverse of the DOM. –  Pointy Jul 18 '13 at 16:31
    
I see and thank you for your help, but it`s working only with document.body –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 16:42
show 1 more comment

Walk the DOM tree, get all the text nodes, get the nodeValue of the text node.

var result = [];
var itr = document.createTreeWalker(
    document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0],
    NodeFilter.SHOW_TEXT,
    null, // no filter
    false);
while(itr.nextNode()) {
    if(itr.currentNode.nodeValue != "")
        result.push(itr.currentNode.nodeValue);
}
alert(result);

Alternate method: Split on the HTML tag's textContent.

var result = document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0].textContent.split("\n");
for(var i=0; i<result.length; i++)
    if(result[i] == "")
        result.splice(i, 1);
alert(result);
share|improve this answer
    
whoa - learn something new every day! –  Pointy Jul 18 '13 at 16:01
    
@Connor - use the DOMReady event. jsfiddle.net/NvbKL/2 –  LastCoder Jul 18 '13 at 16:21
    
@Connor - createTreeWalker has sketchy support in older versions of IE. –  LastCoder Jul 18 '13 at 16:23
    
Yeah, my bad work when ready. –  Connor Jul 18 '13 at 17:24
add comment

Seems to be a one line solution (fiddle):

document.body.innerHTML.replace(/^\s*<[^>]*>\s*|\s*<[^>]*>\s*$|>\s*</g,'').split(/<[^>]*>/g)

This may fail if there are complicated scripts in the body, though, and I know that parsing HTML with regular expressions is not a very clever idea, but for simple cases or for demo purposes it still can be suitable, can't it? :)

share|improve this answer
add comment
    <html>
    <head>
            <title>Hello world!</title>
    </head>
    <body>
            <h1>Hello!</h1>
            <p>
                    <div>What are you doing?</div>
                    <div>Fine, 
                        <span> and you? </span>
                    </div>
            </p>
            <a href="http://google.com">Thank you!</a>
            <script type="text/javascript">
                function getLeafNodesOfHTMLTree(root) {
                    if (root.nodeType == 3) {
                        return [root];
                    } else {
                        var all = [];
                        for (var i = 0; i < root.childNodes.length; i++) {
                            var ret2 = getLeafNodesOfHTMLTree(root.childNodes[i]);
                            all = all.concat(ret2);
                        }
                        return all;
                    }
                }
                var allnodes = getLeafNodesOfHTMLTree(document.getElementsByTagName("html")[0]);
                console.log(allnodes);
                 //in modern browsers that surport array filter and map
                allnodes = allnodes.filter(function (node) {
                    return node && node.nodeValue && node.nodeValue.replace(/\s/g, '').length;
                });
                allnodes = allnodes.map(function (node) {
                    return node.nodeValue
                })
                 console.log(allnodes);
            </script>
    </body>
    </html>
share|improve this answer
    
The "childNodes" of an element are just the immediate children. –  Pointy Jul 18 '13 at 15:58
    
yeah ,I correct it now –  tom Jul 18 '13 at 16:29
1  
by the way , P tag can not contains DIV tag see stackoverflow.com/questions/8397852/… –  tom Jul 18 '13 at 16:30
    
i know, it`s just an example .. my script should work on not w3 validated pages –  smotru Jul 18 '13 at 16:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.