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Between these three sources, is there a difference in terms of efficency?

for (int i=0; i<N; i++)
    int j = whatever();

and

int j;
for (int i=0; i<N; i++)
    j = whatever();

and

int i, j;
for (i=0; i<N; i++)
    j = whatever();

Thanks.

PS: obviously my question is not referred to the scope of the variable but only on the efficency of the loop, expecially in the first two cases, where the variable j is declared one vs. N times.

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4  
Benchmark it! But also don't micro-optimize! Use the most readable one. –  minitech Jul 18 '13 at 16:16
1  
I don't think there should be any difference; the compiler should be able to tell that they all do the exact same thing. –  feralin Jul 18 '13 at 16:16
1  
There's a chance that the first might be ever so slightly more efficient than the second. –  Hot Licks Jul 18 '13 at 16:16
    
@HotLicks why? I would think that having an extra declaration inside the loop might make it a tiny bit slower, but only if the Java compiler doesn't spot it. –  feralin Jul 18 '13 at 16:17
    
I'd bet there is no difference in bytecode. –  zch Jul 18 '13 at 16:17

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Once code is optimized by the compiler there should be no difference.

If you are running under debug mode where by default optimization is turned off, if you declare the variable inside the loop scope, it is less efficient than declaring the variable outside the loop scope.

In this case for every iteration of the loop, the code will create space for the variable on stack and after the iteration it will be discarded. This is slightly inefficient.

But for the loop variable (i) where you declare it before the for loop or inside doesn't matter because it will be allocated on stack only once.

Therefore to conclude in debug mode, both 2 and 3 performs better than 1. And in release mode all 3 will be the same.

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Declaring a variable has no impact on performance. Once the code is compiled the JIT is smart enough to pre-assign local variables.

Technically, limiting the scope of a variable can improve performance as it doesn't have to keep the variable after it is no longer needed, but I suspect the JIT is smart enough to work that out as well.

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This is weird, so you say that the SECOND might be slower than the FIRST example? (obviously considering that they are identical most of the times) –  Beppi's Jul 18 '13 at 16:26
    
Yep, limiting scope (potentially) minimizes the total amount of space required for the stack frame. The effect would be small, at best (worst?), but could possibly be measured (especially if you repeated the scenario several dozen times in a single method). –  Hot Licks Jul 18 '13 at 17:28
    
@Beppi's Yes, if the JIT fails to detect that i and j are not needed after the loop, you could end up using more variables, registers etc potentially impacting performance or making certain optimisations more difficult. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 18 '13 at 18:05
1  
@PeterLawrey - An optimizing JITC would almost certainly detect that the vars were not used. I'm not sure about javac, though, so the impact would be mostly on the interpreter. Plus some more primitive JITCs allocate auto vars 1:1 with the vars in the javac generated code. –  Hot Licks Jul 19 '13 at 11:04

Declaring a variable influences compile time, not run time. The space the local variable is going to occupy on the stack is allocated at compile time, so run-time is not going to get influenced.

What's going to get influenced is readability: generally, it is best to declare your variables close to places where they get used, and keep them in as tight a scope as your program allows. In this sense, your first code snippet is best.

The only reason to go with snippets 2 or 3 is when you need the value of variables i or j after the loop has finished, for example, to find out when a break statement has been executed. It is not possible to tell from your examples if this is the case or not.

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Yes but at run time the variable should be freed and re-allocated N times, or not? –  Beppi's Jul 18 '13 at 16:27
3  
@Beppi's There's no "freeing" and "reallocation" going on at all: the space on the stack is reserved at compile time, gets allocated when your function starts, and it stays there until your function returns. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 18 '13 at 16:29

No. You need to understand code is compiled to bytecode, which is then run on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) which transforms the bytecode to machine code and does optimizations on fly just-in-time (JIT).

Many simply things like multiple variable declaration are optimized away in either the compilation to bytecode, or during the JIT.

I wish I could link you to a good article on this, but I don't have one in mind.

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They're actually all the same thing. The only difference between them is that in your second example one variable is scoped outside of the loop and in the second, both variables are scoped outside of the loop. In your first example, neither of the variables would be accessible outside of the loop which makes it generally the better way of handling variables in a loop unless there is a reason for them to be accessible outside of it.

int x = 0;

Simply requires the JVM to assign a raw 32bit value of 0 to the location in memory associated with x. However, it gets fun when you use autoboxing in situations like this as Integer x = 0 requires the JVM to instantiate a new object which has a lot more resource requirements.

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In the first example the variable will be initializad N times.

Basically, there is no significant difference between the three examples. Depends whether you will need the j variable in a wider scope. This makes the main difference.

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There is no variable "initialization", only assignment. The number of assignments are the same. –  Hot Licks Jul 20 '13 at 1:06

As written? No.

Are there cases where the distinction matters? Yes.

Do those cases come up frequently where the compiler doesn't handle it for you anyway? No.

In either case by far the best thing to do is test it. It is much easier to answer (and help) with "Why does this run slower than that?"

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there is no difference between the three examples in term of efficiecy.But as per coding standards you should declare the variables , when it is only required . Alsothere is difference in in terms of visibilty of variable. Let me explain

option1

 for (int i=0; i<N; i++)
int j = whatever();

here scope of variable j is with in the for loop only

option 2

int j;
for (int i=0; i<N; i++)
    j = whatever();

here j is visible inside and outside of for loop but i is visible only with in the scope of for loop

option 3

int i, j;
for (i=0; i<N; i++)
    j = whatever();

here variables i and j are visible at both places i.e outside and inside of for loop

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Unless you're executing this code fragment millions of times, the answer is to choose the most readable (and therefore the most maintainable) source code.

Even if one of the techniques above is markedly faster, most of your code (over 90%) is not going to be executed that often, so its speed is irrelevant to your overall program performance. Concentrate on writing code that is readable, understandable, and maintainable. Then you can optimize the 10% (or less) of your code that really does cause a performance bottleneck.

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