Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I like to keep my javascript separated out into class files. I've recently come across a need to be able to provide a callback function to a function in another javascript file access via dot notation as the function is part of an object.

So for instance if I have an object called MyObject, and it has a function called doSomething, and I wanted to have a callback for the doSomething function, but I am creating my instance of the object in another class file, and I pass my callback to the class file, it is run in that scope and not in the scope of the originating file.

FirstObject = function(options){

    var FirstObject = this;
    FirstObject.something = "somevalue";

    FirstObject.MyObject = new MyObject();
    FirstObject.MyObject.doSomething(param1, function(){//I need to be able to reference FirstObject.something here});
}

I know I can do this by firing an event in the second one, like: $(document).trigger("doSomething-Finished") and listen for this in the originating document, but I'd like to have more direct access. I feel like it must be possible since this works with jQuery callbacks.

I've seen the answer on this question: scope when doing OO javascript callbacks

but I don't really understand what exactly he is doing in the solution and how to implement it for my specific situation.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand. You simply can reference FirstObject.something from that function? You just can't use this. –  Bergi Jul 18 '13 at 16:39
    
Please don't confuse (variable) scope with the this context! –  Bergi Jul 18 '13 at 16:39
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use ES5 "bind" method on the callback function to ensure the desired scope is properly set, see MDN documentation.

FirstObject = function(options){

    var FirstObject = this;
    FirstObject.something = "somevalue";

    FirstObject.MyObject = new MyObject();

    var callback = function (){
        // "this" will be a reference to FirstObject, thanks to "bind" call below
    };

    FirstObject.MyObject.doSomething(param1, callback.bind(FirstObject));
}

Another way to keep a reference to FirstObject is by simply use dependency injection. Here is an example using constructor injection but you also can use a setter function:

FirstObject = function(options){

    var FirstObject = this;
    FirstObject.something = "somevalue";

    // pass FirstObject to sub object constructor
    // note that MyObject needs to store the reference for later use
    FirstObject.MyObject = new MyObject(FirstObject);


    FirstObject.MyObject.doSomething(param1, function(){//I need to be able to reference FirstObject.something here});
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can bind the function to your object:

FirstObject = function(options){

    var FirstObject = this;
    FirstObject.something = "somevalue";

    FirstObject.MyObject = new MyObject();
    FirstObject.MyObject.doSomething(param1, callback_function.bind(FirstObject.something));

    function callback_function(){
      // this will be FirstObject.something here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.