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I'm somewhat new to nHibernate, especially fluent, and I'm having trouble with mapping a relationship where class A extends class B, but it isn't guaranteed that a given A is also a B. Here's an idea of what the structure looks like so far (and it's open to suggestion):

public class User
{
    public virtual Guid Id;
    public virtual string UserName;
    public virtual string HashedPassword;
    //...
}

public class Student : User
{
    public virtual Guid UserId;
    public virtual School School;
    public virtual float GPA;
}

public class Teacher : User
{
    public virtual Guid UserId;
    public virtual School School;
    public virtual string ClassName;
}

So I want to have Teacher and Student objects that I can work with, but I also want to be able to keep track of them for membership validation (hence the User base class).

So two questions:

  1. Is this a reasonable way to do what I'm trying to do?

  2. If so, how can this be mapped using Fluent nHibernate?

share|improve this question
    
why is User a base class instead of an interface? it looks strange to see 2 Ids on the same class (Id and UserId)# – Firo Jul 19 '13 at 7:16
    
@Firo yeah I actually since made it an abstract class (cuz I want to keep the membership logic there) and took out the UserIds on the sublasses (which I only put there because I thought NHibernate was going to need it) – Phillip Schmidt Jul 19 '13 at 19:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Option 1

public class UserMap : ClassMap<User>
{
    public UserMap()
    {
        Table("Users");

        Id(x => x.Id);

        Map(x => x.Name);
        Map(x => x.HashedPassword);
    }
}
public class StudentMap : SubclassMap<Student>
{
    public StudentMap()
    {
        Table("Students");

        References(x => x.School);
        Map(x => x.GPA);
    }
}
public class TeacherMap : SubclassMap<Teacher>
...

tables

Users (
    Id,        // PK
    Name,
    HashedPassword
)
Students (
    User_Id,        // PK, FK
    School_id,
    Gpa
)

Option 2

public class UserMap : ClassMap<User>
{
    public UserMap()
    {
        Table("Users");
        DiscriminateSubclassesOnColumn("UserType", "user");

        Id(x => x.Id);

        Map(x => x.Name);
        Map(x => x.HashedPassword);
    }
}
public class StudentMap : SubclassMap<Student>
{
    public StudentMap()
    {
        DiscriminatorValue("student");

        References(x => x.School);
        Map(x => x.GPA);
    }
}
public class TeacherMap : SubclassMap<Teacher>
...

tables

Users (
    Id,        // PK
    UserType,
    Name,
    HashedPassword
    School_id,
    Gpa
    Classname
)

Option 3

public abstract class UserMap<TUser> : ClassMap<TUser> where TUser : User
{
    public UserMap()
    {
        Id(x => x.Id);

        Map(x => x.Name);
        Map(x => x.HashedPassword);
    }
}
public class StudentMap : UserMap<Student>
{
    public StudentMap()
    {
        Table("Students");

        References(x => x.School);
        Map(x => x.GPA);
    }
}
public class TeacherMap : UserMap<Teacher>
...

tables

Students (
    Id,        // PK
    Name,
    HashedPassword
    School_id,
    Gpa
)
Teachers (
    Id,        // PK
    Name,
    HashedPassword
    School_id,
    Classname
)
share|improve this answer
    
I did some researching yesterday and ended up going with option 2. Nice answer! – Phillip Schmidt Jul 19 '13 at 22:28

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