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I'm new to javascript and am not real capable with the asynchronous aspects, closures, etc. I have done a few days research on this and lots of trial & error but can't seem to get past my issue, which is:

I am trying to walk a tree structure, gathering all the bottom level nodes (those without child nodes). This node data gets loaded into global arrays (not optimal but needed). The walk function I'm using is recursive. But the asynchronous nature cause the first call to the function to return before the recursive calls return, so the complete tree doesn't get interrogated. I tried putting it in an anonymous function which seems to get the entire tree traversed, but then the global arrays are not being loaded (inaccessible?).

BTW, the real code is on a separate, isolated network so a direct cut & paste to here is not possible. Below is functional equivalent of the relevant parts (unless I've made a typo). Apologies for that. Any help would be appreciated.

var nodeList = new Array(); // global variable

function someFunction(rootNode) {
   // unrelated processing here
   walkTree(rootNode);   // gather the childless nodes
   return;
}

function walkTree(node) {
   return function() {   // required in order traverse the entire tree
                         // but with it, nodeList does not get populated
      var num = node.numChildren();
      var childNodes = node.getChildNodes();
      for (var i=0; i<num; i++)  {
         var currentNode = childNodes.item(i);
         if (currentNode.numChildren() > 0) {
            walkTree(currentNode);
         }
         else {
             var obj = new Object();
             /// extract certain attributes of current node here
             /// and make a variant 
             nodeList[nodeList.length] = obj;
         }
      } // END for
   } // close anonymous function
} // END FUNCTION 
share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure this is asynchronous? It doesn't look like it to me. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 18:08
1  
I see no asynchronousnous... –  Neal Jul 18 '13 at 18:08
2  
This code doesn't compute anything. The call to walkTree(rootNode) creates an anonymous function and returns it, but does not call the anonymous function. It's not clear what you're trying to accomplish by this. Do you need asynchronous execution? –  Ted Hopp Jul 18 '13 at 18:12
    
Maybe I used the wrong terminology. What I know is the walkTree function returns before the successive recursive calls can complete, thus the tree is only partially loaded. I am used to languages in which execution halts until the recursion completes. Sorry for the red herring. –  user2596595 Jul 18 '13 at 18:14
1  
As @TedHopp stated, it returns a function, but it does not call that function (which is why walkTree is not being called and you array is not being populated). Each call of that function would return a function which would then need to be called, which would return a function... etc.... So I suspect you don't need the anonymous function construction, and rather just want to execute that code. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you don't need asynchronous execution, your code can be simplified:

var nodeList = [];

function someFunction(rootNode) {
   // unrelated processing here
   walkTree(rootNode);   // gather the childless nodes
   return;
}

function walkTree(node) {
   var num = node.numChildren(),
       childNodes = node.getChildNodes();
   for (var i=0; i<num; i++)  {
      var currentNode = childNodes.item(i);
      if (currentNode.numChildren() > 0) {
         walkTree(currentNode);
      }
      else {
         var obj = new Object();
         /// extract certain attributes of current node here
         /// and make a variant 
         nodeList.push(obj);
      }
   }
}

If you do need asynchronous execution, the implementation would depend on what asynchronous mechanism you used (web workers, simulation using setTimeout, a framework like Clumpy, etc.).

With Clumpy, for instance, you might code it like this (untested):

var nodeList = [],
    clumpy = new Clumpy();

function someFunction(rootNode) {
   // unrelated processing here
   walkTree(rootNode);   // gather the childless nodes
   return;
}

function walkTree(node) {
   var num = node.numChildren(),
       childNodes = node.getChildNodes(),
       i;
   clumpy.for_loop(
       function() { i = 0; },
       function() { return i < num; },
       function() { i++; },
       function() {
           var currentNode = childNodes.item(i);
           if (currentNode.numChildren() > 0) {
              walkTree(currentNode);
           }
           else {
              var obj = new Object();
              /// extract certain attributes of current node here
              /// and make a variant 
              nodeList.push(obj);
           }
       }
   );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I took out the anonymous function. What remains is what you have above (the non-clumpy version). As you would guess, it does not solve the problem of large or deeply-nested tree structures. The subsequent (recursive) calls to walkTree do not complete before the original call returns; i.e. the push() does not get executed. It works for small/simple nodes. Is there any way to guarantee completion of a function call in javascript before the program continues? –  user2596595 Jul 18 '13 at 19:59
    
@user2596595 - How did you conclude that the top-level call to walkTree returns prematurely? I think that this is impossible with my first code. The method will block until all recursive calls are complete. –  Ted Hopp Jul 18 '13 at 20:25
    
I added a global variable debugCounter. It is initialized prior to the walkTree call in someFunction. It is incremented inside the else statement just before the push. It works depending on which tree I send it. For sparse trees it counts correctly, for a dense/deep-nested tree it only reaches 1. I am using an alert called at another point in the code. (Firebug is not approved for the host system so debugging is a challenge.) –  user2596595 Jul 19 '13 at 12:54
    
@user2596595 - If the structure-walking functions behave as expected, I don't see how that's possible. Is there a chance that childNodes.item(i) could return undefined or null, or that node.numChildren() returns 0 or a negative number when there are children? Can you reproduce the behavior on a browser that allows Firebug, or perhaps in a browser that has a built-in equivalent (such as Chrome)? –  Ted Hopp Jul 19 '13 at 14:00
    
Chrome is also not approved. I am stuck with IE9, specifically the 32-bit version. I added checks for a current node of undefined type & numChildren < 1. Those alerts never get triggered. I am now suspecting a peculiarity with the tree itself. I am attempting to reduce the considerable size and see if anything shows itself. I appreciate the help. I will be back when I know more. –  user2596595 Jul 19 '13 at 19:57

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