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I've been searching for a good trick to make a Hide/Show content or a list with only CSS and no javascript. I've managed to make this action:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>

   <style>
      #cont {display: none; }
      .show:focus + .hide {display: inline; }
      .show:focus + .hide + #cont {display: block;}
   </style>

</head>
<body>

   <div>
        <a href="#show"class="show">[Show]</a>
        <a href="#hide"class="hide">/ [Hide]</a>
        <div id="cont">Content</div>
   </div>

</body>
</html>

Demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/ And it's working but not as it should. Here is the problem: When the content is shown, you can hide it by clicking "anywhere on the page". How to disable that? how to hide content "only" by clicking hide? Thank you in advance!

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Behavior is supposed to only exist in the realm of JavaScript. –  cimmanon Jul 18 '13 at 18:55
    
that's why I'm here! to suppose it in CSS3 too! no need for javascript! let's hope for that! ;) –  Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I wouldn't use checkboxes, i'd use the code you already have

DEMO http://jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/1/

CSS

body {
  display: block;
}
.span3:focus ~ .alert {
  display: none;
}
.span2:focus ~ .alert {
  display: block;
}
.alert{display:none;}

HTML

<span class="span3">Hide Me</span>
<span class="span2">Show Me</span>
<p class="alert" >Some alarming information here</p>

This way the text is only hidden on click of the hide element

share|improve this answer
    
Good tip. But it would be great if the text was hidden first. In this order: To Show it, then hide it. –  Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:33
    
I've just added this .alert{display:none;} and it worked fine. but when I add some others, it goes messy: jsfiddle.net/6W7XD/12 thx anyway –  Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 21:00
    
As soon as the focus moves to anything other than either one of the SPANs, the display settings change back. So if the user needs to click on content, the content will change. –  Sandy Good Jul 9 at 0:54

There is 3 rapid examples with pure CSS and without javascript where the content appears "on click", with a "maintained click" and a third "onhover" (all only tested in Chrome). Sorry for the up of this post but this question are the first seo result and maybe my contribution can help beginner like me

I think (not tested) but the advantage of argument "content" that you can add great icon like from Font Awesome (its \f-Code) or an hexadecimal icon in place of the text "Hide" and "Show" to internationalize the trick.

example link http://jsfiddle.net/MonkeyTime/h3E9p/2/

<style>
label { position: absolute; top:0; left:0}

input#show, input#hide {
    display:none;
}

span#content {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}

input#show:checked ~ .show:before {
    content: ""
}
input#show:checked ~ .hide:before {
    content: "Hide"
}

input#hide:checked ~ .hide:before {
    content: ""
}
input#hide:checked ~ .show:before {
    content: "Show"
}
input#show:checked ~ span#content {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}
input#hide:checked ~ span#content {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
</style>
<input type="radio" id="show" name="group">   
<input type="radio" id="hide" name="group" checked>
<label for="hide" class="hide"></label>
<label for="show" class="show"></label>
<span id="content">Lorem iupsum dolor si amet</span>


<style>
#show1 { position: absolute; top:20px; left:0}
#content1 {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#show1:before {
    content: "Show"
}
#show1:active.show1:before {
    content: "Hide"
}
#show1:active ~ span#content1 {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}
</style>

<div id="show1" class="show1"></div>
<span id="content1">Ipsum Lorem</span>


<style>
#show2 { position: absolute; top:40px; left:0}
#content2 {
    display: block;
    -webkit-transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    transition: opacity 1s ease-out;
    opacity: 0; 
    height: 0;
    font-size: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#show2:before {
    content: "Show"
}
#show2:hover.show2:before {
    content: "Hide"
}
#show2:hover ~ span#content2 {
    opacity: 1;
    font-size: 100%;
    height: auto;
}

/* extra */
#content, #content1, #content2 {
    float: left;
    margin: 100px auto;
}
</style>

<div id="show2" class="show2"></div>
<span id="content2">Lorem Ipsum</span>
share|improve this answer

This is going to blow your mind: Hidden radio buttons.

HTML:

<label for="show">
    <span>[Show]</span>
</label>
<input type=radio id="show" name="group">
<label for="hide">
    <span>[Hide]</span> 
</label>    
<input type=radio id="hide" name="group">
<span id="content">Content</span>

And CSS:

input#show, input#hide {
    display:none;
}

span#content {
    display:none;
}
input#show:checked ~ span#content {
  display:block;
}

input#hide:checked ~ span#content {
    display:none;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure it's working? not working for me though (I'm using Firefox) –  Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 19:26
    
Working for me on FF/Chrome/IE. Try copy/pasting into a new one, that might work. –  Pat Lillis Jul 18 '13 at 19:30
    
Glad to hear it. –  Pat Lillis Jul 18 '13 at 20:37
    
Yes, worked! a checkboxe was displayed, so I replaced first line! thx mate! :) If no one come up with a non-checkboxes solution, well it's all yours ;) –  Frederic Kizar Jul 18 '13 at 20:40
    
Cool cool. This does seem kind of cheaty, but eh it gets the job done. –  Pat Lillis Jul 18 '13 at 20:41

I've got another simple solution:

HTML:

<a href="#alert" class="span3" tabindex="0">Hide Me</a>
<a href="#" class="span2" tabindex="0">Show Me</a>
<p id="alert" class="alert" >Some alarming information here</p>

CSS:

body { display: block; }
p.alert:target { display: none; }

Source: http://css-tricks.com/off-canvas-menu-with-css-target/

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