Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why do people do this in CSS:

#section #content h1
{
   margin:0;
}

When they can just do:

#content h1
{
   margin:0;
}

for code like this:

<div id="section">
    <div id="content">

    </div>
</div>

and get the same results (at least in IE7 - my target browser, unfortunately). Is it just for specificity in the code? Code clarity to declare what you are referring to?

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

CSS files are generally designed to be reusable so that the same CSS can be used all over the website and can be applied to all pages in the application.

Targeting a very Specific node can be useful to prevent any surprising behavior.

Suppose you had this code as you said,

#content h1
{
   margin:0;
}


<div id="section">
    <div id="content">

    </div>
</div>

Someone came after you and created another HTML page using the same CSS and the structure was this

<div id="content">

</div>

and you desire a different styling for the H1 on this page.

You can argue that even with this CSS

#section #content h1
{
   margin:0;
}

if the new page consisted of the same structure,

<div id="section">
    <div id="content">

    </div>
</div>

well in that case it is easier to debug, in this example the structure is quite simple, but real life CSS tend to be complex.

share|improve this answer
    
@user2596900 does this answer your question? –  user2580076 Jul 18 '13 at 20:26
add comment

You should never need multiple IDs in a selector since IDs must be globally unique in the document. This means your #section #content h1 is overkill since it includes 2 IDs.

Other types of selectors (classes, tag names, etc) are not unique, so you might need to string a few together to get the element you want. For example, #section .content p would be perfectly reasonable in many contexts.

share|improve this answer
3  
"since IDs must be globally unique in the document" but not across an entire site. The same lone element with an ID may occur in different contexts depending on which page you're viewing. –  BoltClock Jul 18 '13 at 19:33
    
@BoltClock - That's an interesting point. I guess the user might want page-specific styles that might be possible with nested IDs. I think I may have done this once where I gave the <body> of each page a unique ID (generated based off the URL), and used that for style purposes. However, I ended up scraping that in favor of something cleaner. –  DaoWen Jul 18 '13 at 19:38
2  
This would also come into play if you have a css style on #section .sectionclass h1, and #content has the class .sectionclass. #content h1 wouldn't override #section .sectionclass h1, since the latter is more specific than the former, but #section #content h1 is more specific than #section .sectionclass h1, since 2 IDs > 1 ID 1 Class in .css. –  ckersch Jul 18 '13 at 20:10
add comment

If you (or anybody else) is doing it, you shouldn't be. You're just trying to hold together a poorly developed CSS structure.

Try your hardest to stick to this rule: IDs are for JavaScript, classes are for CSS.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I think the rule is: 'if it can occure only once per page, use an ID, if it can occure multiple times, use a class.' So your company logo would be an ID, a thumbnail would be a class. ID's are much better for performance, as they can appear only once. Js or CSS should not be a criterium. –  PeterVR Jul 18 '13 at 20:05
    
That's not my rule. –  Adam Jul 18 '13 at 20:19
add comment

You might not want all #content h1 to look the same.

In that case #content h1 might have an ancestor ID/Class that you would want to latch onto so you can change the style of the h1 for those instances.

For example:

#content h1 { /* style 1 */ }

#about #content h1,
#contact-us #content h1,
.products #content h1 { /* style 2 */ }
share|improve this answer
add comment

The term you are looking for is "Specificity" best example ive seen to describe this is using a points based system.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You use multiple selectors so that you don't select sections that you don't want.

For example, taking your use case, we would have to expand it from a section and content div, to something slightly larger.

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="header">
        <div class="content">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="section>
        <div class="content">
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Now, without adding the extra specificity, you will grab all H1 tags in every content section of the page, but you probably don't want to do that.

It's not a problem to be non-specific in small files, but when you begin to reach into the hundreds of possible css interactions being very specific about what you are doing in the css can save you major headaches.

share|improve this answer
1  
OP asked about ID selectors in CSS not classes or other ones. ID MUST be unique in a page. technically there's no need to use multiple ID selectors, unless the page is generated dynamically. (anyway, I'm not the downvoter) –  Hashem Qolami Jul 18 '13 at 20:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.